Silver Book Fact

A one percent reduction in cancer-related deaths in the U.S. would be worth an estimated $500 billion to society from increased quality of life and increased productivity from longer lives.

Murphy, K and R Topel. The Value of Health and Longevity. J Political Econ. 2006; 114(5): 871-904. https://www.dartmouth.edu/~jskinner/documents/MurphyTopelJPE.pdf

Reference

Title
The Value of Health and Longevity
Publication
J Political Econ
Publication Date
2006
Authors
Murphy, K and R Topel
Volume & Issue
Volume 114, Issue 5
Pages
871-904
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Future Value

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