Silver Book Fact

A 67% increase in cancer incidence is anticipated for older adults, compared with an 11% increase for younger adults from 2010 to 2030.

Smith, Benjamin D., Grace L. Smith, Arti Hurria, Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, Thomas A. Buchholz. Future of Cancer Incidence in the United States: Burdens Upon an Aging, Changing Nation. Journal of Clinical Oncology. April 2009; 27(17): 2758-65. http://jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/content/short/27/17/2758?rss=1&ssource=mfc

Reference

Title
Future of Cancer Incidence in the United States: Burdens Upon an Aging, Changing Nation
Publication
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Publication Date
April 2009
Authors
Smith, Benjamin D., Grace L. Smith, Arti Hurria, Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, Thomas A. Buchholz
Volume & Issue
Volume 27, Issue 17
Pages
2758-65
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence

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