Silver Book Fact

A 10 percent reduction in cancer-related deaths in the U.S. would be worth an estimated $4.4 trillion to current and future generations.

Murphy, Kevin M. and Robert H. Topel. Measuring the Gains from Medical Research: An economic approach. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press; 2003

Reference

Title
Measuring the Gains from Medical Research: An economic approach
Publisher
The University of Chicago Press
Publication Date
2003
Authors
Murphy, Kevin M. and Robert H. Topel

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Future Value

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