Silver Book Fact

Increase in trouble seeing with age, 2006

16.8% of the non-institutionalized adults 65 years and older have some trouble seeing, even with glasses or contacts. That number increases to 19.9% in adults 75 years and older.

National Center for Health Statistics. Health, United States, 2006: With chartbook on trends in the health of Americans. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control & Prevention; 2006. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus06.pdf

Reference

Title
Health, United States, 2006: With chartbook on trends in the health of Americans
Publisher
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Publication Date
2006
Authors
National Center for Health Statistics
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence
  • Age - A Major Risk Factor

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