Thrombosis  /  Economic Value

Each year around 75,000 Americans are diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AFib), 900,000 experience a venous thromboembolism event (VTE), and 800,000 have a stroke. The burden for those who survive is enormous and the cost of care a major expense for individuals and the nation. Fortunately research advances are offering significant hope. A number of investigative anticoagulants have the potential to reduce strokes in AFib patients while also reducing the risk of bleeds; clot-dissolving agents are proving to lessen the effects of strokes; and the same drugs in the pipeline for AFib could prevent VTE after major orthopedic surgery.

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    • Effectiveness of treating ischemic strokert-PA within 3 hours of symptom onset
      A study of the  victims with effectiveness of treating ischemic strokert-PA within 3 hours of symptom onset showed a decrease in rehabilitation costs of $1.4 million and nursing home costs of…  
    • t-PA cost savings
      The total annual benefit to society from t-PA use in the United States is around $363 million—$60 million in direct cost savings to society plus an additional 7,510 QALYs. This means…  
    • Per-patient annual cost of treating stroke in atrial fibrillation patients
      The per-patient annual cost of treating stroke in atrial fibrillation patients was found to be $1,485 in a wellcontrolled anti-coagulation clinic, $3,710 for those receiving warfarin in routine medical care,…  
    • Cost of warfarin therapy for AFib patients
      In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) and one additional stroke risk factor, warfarin therapy cost $8,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) saved.  
    • Cost-savings associated with Warfarin use in AFib patients
      Warfarin use in Medicare patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation was independently associated with lower medical costs averaging $9,836 per patient, per year.  
    • AFib practice guidelines reduce direct health care costs
      The use of practice guidelines in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients significantly decreased hospitalization and resource utilization—with an average decrease in 30-day total direct health care costs of around $1,400 per patient.