Stroke  /  Cost of Disease

Stroke is the 5th leading cause of death in the U.S. and kills more than 129,000 people each year. Someone in the U.S. has a stroke about once every 40 seconds. People do survive stroke--around 795,000 strokes occur each year and there are an estimated 7 million stroke survivors in the U.S.--but they are often left with significant disabilities.

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    • Average Length of Hospital Stay for Stroke Patients
      The average length of stay for hospitalized stroke patients was 4.7 days in 2014.  
    • 2015 Female Stroke Deaths
      In 2015, females accounted for 58% of stroke-related deaths in the US.  
    • Highest and Lowest Stroke Prevalence by State in U.S. Adults
      2.7% of U.S. adults suffer from stroke, with the highest prevalence in Alabama (4.3%) and the lowest prevalence in Minnesota (1.9%).  
    • African Americans in Southeastern U.S. and Stroke Burden
      African Americans and those living in the southeastern United States experience the greatest disease burden of stroke.    
    • Annual strokes: new and recurrent
      Each year, about 795,000 people experience a new (~610,000 cases) or recurrent (~185,000 cases) stroke.  
    • Stroke deaths and disability
      Stroke accounts for 1 of every 19 deaths in the US and is a leading cause of serious long-term disability.  
    • Risk of stroke in people with AFib
      The risk of having a stroke increases 5-fold in individuals with AFib. Individuals with AFib also have more severe and recurrent strokes than those without the disease.  
    • AFib-related stroke and disability
      Stroke is very disabling and individuals recovering from a stroke who also have AFib have a higher risk of remaining disable or handicapped compared to stroke patients without AFib.  
    • Hospitalization costs for patients with nonrecurrent ischemic stroke
      The cost of hospitalization for patients with nonrecurrent ischemic stroke is $4,991 more in patients with atrial fibrillation, than in patients without the disease.        
    • Hospital costs for ischemic stroke
      Hospital costs for nonrecurrent ischemic stroke are 20% higher in patients with atrial fibrillation, than in patients without the disease.  
    • By 2030, the medical costs for cardiovascular disease will triple to $818 billion from 2010.  
    • In 2009, 1 million Americans were hospitalized for stroke.  
    • Every 4 minutes someone in the U.S. dies from a stroke.  
    • Annual strokes from AFib
      Atrial fibrillation accounts for between 75,000 and 100,000 strokes per year.  
    • By 2030, it is projected that an additional 4 million people will have had a stroke–a 25% increase in prevalence from 2010.  
    • The mean cost per person with stroke in the U.S. in 2007 was estimated at $7,657.  
    • The estimated direct medical cost of stroke in 2008 was $18.8 billion–this includes hospital outpatient stays, emergency department visits, prescribed medications, and home health care.  
    • Within 1 year of a transient ischemic attack, around 12% of patients will die.  
    • Atrial fibrillation increases stroke risk
      Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke 5- fold.  
    • In 2009, stroke as a first-listed diagnosis was the cause of 3.3 million physician office visits, 768,000 emergency department visits and 127,000 outpatient department visits.  
    • When considered separately from other forms of cardiovascular disease, stroke ranks as the 4th leading cause of death in the U.S.  
    • Stroke accounts for 1 in every 18 deaths in the U.S.  
    • Every 4 minutes, someone in the U.S. dies from a stroke.  
    • AFib attributed stroke rate by age
      The percentage of strokes attributable to atrial fibrillation increases from 1.5% at ages 50 to 59, to 23.5% at ages 80 to 89.  
    • Average age at death from stroke, 2002
      In 2002, the mean age at death from stroke was 79.6 years.  
    • An estimated 7 million Americans age 20 and older have had a stroke.  
    • Every 40 seconds, someone in the U.S. has a stroke.  
    • Each year, around 795,000 Americans experience a new or recurrent stroke–around 610,000 are first attacks and 185,000 are recurrent.  
    • The projected total cost of ischemic stroke from 2005 to 2050 (in 2005 dollars) is around $2.2 trillion.  
    • Total direct and indirect costs of stroke in the U.S. are projected to reach $140 billion by 2030. This represents a 238% change in direct costs compared to 2010, and…  
    • If current trends in mortality continue, the United States will see a doubling in deaths from ischemic strokebetween 2003 and 2033.  
    • By 2030, the prevalence of stroke is projected to increase approximately 25%. This means there will bean additional 4 million Americans with stroke (compared to 2010).  
    • Breakdown of Direct Costs of Stroke (Short Term and Long Term) by Type of Expense  
    • Annual AFib-related stroke Medicare costs
      Stroke in Medicare patients with atrial fibrillation who were not treated with anticoagulants, cost Medicare $4.8 billion each year in direct costs. Those who had strokes despite prophylactic treatment cost an additional…  
    • In 2006, $3.9 billion was paid to Medicare beneficiaries discharged from short-stay hospitals for stroke.  
    • The mean hospitalization costs for patients admitted for stroke range from $8,000 to $23,000 (in 2008 dollars).  
    • The estimated cost of stroke for the first 30 days after the event is $20,346 for severe ischemic strokes and $13,019 for mild ones.  
    • Of the $73.7 billion cost of stroke in 2010—$21 billion was for hospital costs, $17.1 billion for nursing home costs, $3.8 billion for physicians and other professionals, $1.3 billion for…  
    • The annual direct and indirect costs of stroke are between $40.9 billion and $73.7 billion.  
    • Annual cost of AFib-related stroke in Medicare patients
      The annual cost of stroke in Medicare patients with atrial fibrillation is estimated at $8 billion.  
    • Cost of AFib-related stroke in Medicare patients
      The incremental treatment costs associated with stroke in the year following diagnosis of atrial fibrillation are an estimated $7,907 per Medicare patient.  
    • In one year alone (1990), stroke led to more than 100,000 nursing home admissions with a mean length of stay of 432 days.  
    • Stroke was listed as the first-diagnoses for 3,764,000 ambulatory care visits in 2007.  
    • The mean length of stay for patients hospitalized for stroke ranges from 4.6 to 12.4 days.  
    • In 2004, stroke hospitalizations totaled 726,000.  
    • After a stroke, 15% to 30% of survivors are permanently disabled and 20% require institutional care at 3 months after the stroke.  
    • Of those that survive a stroke, only 10% recover completely.  
    • Of those who survived a stroke, 30% received outpatient rehabilitation.  
    • Ischemic stroke survivors who were 65 years and older had the following disabilities 6 months after their stroke:• 50% had some one-sided paralysis• 30% needed help walking• 26% needed help…  
    • Stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability in the United States.  
    • Every 4 minutes, on average, someone dies of a stroke.  
    • Within 30 days of ischemic stroke, 8.1% of people age 65 and older were dead.  
    • The mean age at death from stroke was 79.6 in 2002.  
    • Stroke is a contributory cause of death for around 230,000 people each year.  
    • One in every 18 deaths in the United States is caused by stroke.  
    • Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States, when considered separately from other cerebrovascular diseases.  
    • AFib strokes occurring in patients 75+
      Close to half of all atrial fibrillation associated strokes occur in patients age 75 and older.  
    • The risk of stroke attributable to atrial fibrillation by age
      The risk of stroke attributable to atrial fibrillation increases from 1.5% for those ages 50 to 59 to 23.5% for those ages 80 to 89.  
    • Atrial fibrillation stroke risk
      Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of severe and recurrent ischemic stroke. Patients not treated with anticoagulants have a 2.1-fold increase in risk of recurrent stroke and 2.4-fold increase in…  
    • Ischemic strokes caused by AFib
      Atrial fibrillation is responsible for at least 15% to 20% of all ischemic strokes.  
    • Risk of ischemic stroke in AFib patients
      The risk of ischemic stroke in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients is 2 to 7 times (200% to 700%) greater than in those without the disease.  
    • Most common causes of death after AFib diagnosis
      Within the first 4 months of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation, the most common cause of cardiovascular deaths are coronary artery disease (22%), heart failure (14%), and ischemic stroke (10%). After…  
    • Prevalence of stroke by age and sex (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: 2005-2008)  
    • Thirty-day mortality rates after stroke increase with age—from 9% in Medicare beneficiaries ages 65 to 74, to 13.1% in beneficiaries ages 74 to 84, to 23% in beneficiaries 85 and…  
    • Stroke prevalence increases with age—the rate at ages 85 to 94 is 3.5 times higher than at ages 65 to 74.  
    • Around 87% of all strokes are ischemic.  
    • Every 40 seconds, on average, someone in the U.S. has a stroke.  
    • Every year, around 795,000 Americans have a stroke—around 610,000 are first time strokes and 185,000 are recurrent attacks.  
    • An estimated 7,000,000 Americans age 20 and older have had a stroke.  
    • Stroke was the third leasing cause of death for those over 65 in 2006 with 297 per 100,000 deaths.  
    • The estimated direct and indirect cost of stroke for 2010 is $73.7 billion.  
    • On average, every 4 minutes someone in the US dies of a stroke.  
    • Stroke accounted for about 1 of every 18 deaths in the US in 2006.  
    • On average, every 40 seconds someone in the US has a stroke.  
    • Among American adults age 20 and older, the estimated prevalence of stroke in 2006 was 6.4 million.  
    • 2005 Stroke Age-Adjusted Death Rates by State  
    • In 2006, $3.9 billion ($7449 per person) was paid to Medicare beneficiaries discharged from short-stay hospitals for stroke.  
    • In 2009, the estimated direct and indirect cost of stroke is $68.9 billion.  
    • 21% of American men and 24% of women age 40 years of age or older died 1 year after their first stroke in 2005.  
    • On average, one American has a stroke every 40 seconds.  
    • Preliminary U.S. data show that stroke accounted for 1 of every 18 deaths in 2006.  
    • About 795,000 Americans experience a new or recurrent stroke each year–about 610,000 are first attacks and 185,000 are recurrent.  
    • In adults >55 years of age, the lifetime risk for stroke is greater than 1 in 6.  
    • Each year, approximately 60,000 more women than men have a stroke.  
    • Each year, about 780,000 people experience a new or recurrent stroke. About 600,000 of these are first attacks,and 180,000 are recurrent attacks.  
    • On average, every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke.  
    • Prevalence of stroke by age and sex  
    • In 2005, an estimated 103,000 inpatient endarterectomy procedures were performed in the U.S. Carotid endarterectomy is the most frequently performed surgical procedure to prevent stroke.  
    • The mean lifetime cost of ischemic stroke in the U.S. is an estimated $140,048. This cost includes inpatient care, rehabilitation, and follow-up care.  
    • In 2001, $3.7 billion was paid to Medicare beneficiaries that were discharged from short-stay hospitals for stroke ($6,037 per discharge).  
    • From 1979 to 2005, the number of inpatient discharges from short-stay hospitals with stroke as the first listed diagnosis increased 20%, to 895,000.  
    • 50-70% of stroke survivors regain functional independence. However, 15-30% are permanently disabled and 20% require institutional care at 3 months after onset.  
    • Of those who have a first stroke, within 5 years: 13% of men and 22% of women ages 40-69 have a recurrent stroke; and 23% of men and 28% of…  
    • The median survival time after a first stroke are: at 60-69 years of age–6.8 years for men and 7.4 years for women; at 70-79 years of age–5.4 years for men…  
    • Within 1 year of a first stroke, 21% of men and 24% of women 40 years of age and older, were dead.  
    • Within 5 years of a first stroke, 47% of men and 51% of women 40 years and older, were dead.  
    • Among those ages 45-64, 8-12% of ischemic strokes, and 37-38% of hemorrhagic strokes, result in death within 30 days.  
    • Those who have a transient ischemic attack have a 10-year stroke risk of 18.8% and a combined 10-year stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death risk of 42.8%.  
    • The prevalence of transient ischemic attack (a mini-stroke that lasts less than 24 hours) in men is estimated at 2.4% for those ages 65-69, and 3.6% for those ages 75-79.…  
    • An estimated 5,600,000 American adults have had a stroke.  
    • In 2004, stroke accounted for around 1 in 16 deaths in the U.S.  
    • When considered separately from cardiovascular disease, stroke is the 3rd leading cause of death in the U.S.  
    • Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the U.S.  
    • In adults over 55 years, the lifetime risk of stroke is greater than 1 in 6.  
    • In 2004, stroke accounted for approximately 1 out of every 16 deaths in the U.S. Approximately 54% of stroke deaths in 2004 occurred out of the hospital.  
    • The length of time to recover from a stroke depends on its severity. From 50% to 70% of stroke survivors regain functional independence, but 15% to 30% are permanently disabled,…  
    • Approximately 780,000 Americans each year experience a new or recurrent stroke. About 600,000 of these are first attacks, and 180,000 are recurrent attacks,  
    • Preliminary data from 2005 indicate that stroke accounted for about 1 of every 17 deaths in the U.S. On average, every 40 seconds someone in the U.S. has a stroke.…  
    • A study of ischemic stroke survivors who were at least 65-years-old found that at 6 months post-stroke 50% had some one-sided paralysis, 30% were unable to walk without some assistance,…  
    • Only 2.7% of 65-year-olds who have experienced a stroke are free of comorbidities and physical limitations–66.4% have 3 or more.  
    • 20% of stroke survivors require institutional care within 3 months after onset and 15% to 30% are permanently disabled.  
    • 5.5 million Americans have survived a stroke, but live with its impact every day.  
    • The conditions and disabilities associated with stroke cost the United States between $30 billion and $40 billion a year.