Persistent Pain  /  Economic Burden

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    • The annual economic cost of persistent pain in the U.S. is at least $560 to $635 billion (in 2010$).  
    • The estimated annual cost of persistent pain of $560 to $635 billion includes health care costs ($261 to $300 billion) and lost productivity ($299 to $335 billion). However, these…  
    • The annual cost of pain is greater (in 2010$) than the annual cost of heart disease ($309 billion), cancer ($243 billion), and diabetes ($188 billion)–and nearly 30% higher than the…  
    • The cost of lost productivity from persistent pain includes days of work missed ($11.6 to $12.7 billion), hours of work lost ($95.2 to $96.5 billion) and lost wages ($190.6 to…  
    • The economic burden of treating persistent pain that develops from acute pain in a 30-year-old over a lifetime is as much as $1 million.  
    • The annual cost to society of persistent pain is equal to around $2,000 for every person living in the U.S.  
    • Medicare bears one-fourth of all expenditures for pain-related treatment in the U.S.  
    • The cost of pain to Medicare was $65.3 billion in 2008–14% of all Medicare costs.  
    • Cost of Persistent Pain and Other Major Chronic Conditions in the U.S.  
    • Low back pain alone was estimated to have contributed almost 3% to the total national increase in health care spending from 1987 to 2000.  
    • The annual direct and indirect costs of several pain-related conditions include: $14 billion for migraines Hu et al. 1999, Burden of Migraine in the U.S. $189 billion for arthritis Yelin et al. 2007, Medical…  
    • The annual direct and indirect costs of several pain-related conditions include: $14 billion for migraines Hu et al. 1999, Burden of Migraine in the U.S. $189 billion for arthritis Yelin et al. 2007, Medical…  
    • A person with moderate pain has health care expenditures $4,516 higher than those without pain. A person with severe pain has health care expenditures $3,210 higher than those with…  
    • Persistent back problems reduce financial capacity by reducing wealth accumulation. Over 99% of individuals who are employed full-time have accumulated some wealth at 65 years, whereas only 74% of…