Neurological Disease  /  Innovative Medical Research

The prevalence of diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are skyrocketing as our population ages and they threaten to bankrupt our economy if better treatments and cures aren't found.  5.4 million Americans are currently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. This number will triple to 16 million by the year 2050. Parkinson’s disease affects 1 million Americans, with at least 60,000 new cases occurring each year.

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    • If the progression of Parkinson’s disease were slowed by 50%, there would be a 35% reduction in excess costs.  
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved five drugs that temporarily improve Alzheimer’s disease symptoms.  
    • Around 75 – 100 experimental therapies that are aimed at slowing or stopping the progression of Alzheimer’s disease are currently in clinical trials.  
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved 5 drugs that have proven to temporarily slow the worsening of Alzheimer’s disease symptoms for an average of 6 – 12 months…  
    • An Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that slowed progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce Medicaid costs for people with the disease by $14 billion in 2020–from…  
    • An Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that slowed its progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce the total costs of care for people with the disease by…  
    • An Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that slowed its progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce the Medicare costs for people with the disease in 2050 by…  
    • An Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that slowed its progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce the Medicare costs for people with the disease by $20 billion…  
    • A treatment breakthrough that slowed the progression of Alzheimer’s disease would reduce the number of people with the disease from 2.4 million to 1.1 million in 2020, and from 6.5…  
    • Impact of Slowed Progression on Severe Stage, Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s, 2010-2050  
    • An Alzheimer’s treatment breakthrough that slowed progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce out-of-pocket costs to people with the disease by $25 billion in 2050–from the…  
    • An Alzheimer’s treatment breakthrough that slowed progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce out-of-pocket costs to people with the disease by $8 billion in 2020–from the…  
    • An Alzheimer’s treatment breakthrough that slowed disease progression and began to show effects in 2015, would reduce Medicaid costs for people with the disease by $62 billion–from the expected $178…  
    • Out-of-Pocket Costs, Slowed Progression  
    • Medicaid Costs, Slowed Progression  
    • Medicare Costs, Slowed Progression  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2050 out-of-pocket costs for individuals and families dealing with the…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2020 out-of-pocket costs to individuals and families dealing with the…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2020 Medicaid costs for people with the disease would be…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2050 Medicare costs for people with the disease would be…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2020 Medicare costs for people with the disease would be…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years were introduced in 2015, by 2050 the total reduction in cost of care for people…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2020 total cost of care (for all payers) for all people…  
    • A treatment that delayed the age of onset of Alzheimer’s disease by five years would reduce the proportion of Americans age 65 and older with the disease from 10% to…  
    • Impact of Slowed Progression by Stage of Disease, Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s Disease, 2050  
    • Impact of Slowed Progression on Alzheimer’s Disease Growth, Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s, 2010-2050  
    • Out-of-Pocket Costs, 5-Year Delayed Onset  
    • Medicaid Costs, 5-Year Delayed Onset  
    • Medicare Costs, 5-Year Delayed Onset  
    • Impact of a 5-Year Delay in Onset on Costs, Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzhemier’s Disease, 2010-2050  
    • Impact of a 5-Year Delay in Onset by Stage of Disease, Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s Disease, 2050  
    • Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s Disease, 2010–2050  
    • “A treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset of Alzheimer’s disease by five years and began to show its effects in 2015 would decrease the total number of Americans…  
    • A large set of NIH clinical trials are assessing interventions (including dietary supplements–creatine and coenzyme Q10) that may slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease.  
    • A new study reports that using optogenetics, stimulating specific brain cells using light, may provide better results for Parkinson’s patients than traditional deep brain stimulation because of the ability to…  
    • One study shows that electrical spinal cord stimulation significantly improved motor function in an animal model of Parkinson’s disease.  
    • A study of Parkinson’s disease treatments found that pramipexole is a cost-effective treatment for early and advanced Parkinson’s disease. The total cost-effectiveness ratio was $8,837/QALY for patients with early Parkinson’s…  
    • Slowing the progression of Parkinson’s disease by just 10% would save $327 million (in direct and indirect costs) to the U.S. annually.  
    • An Alzheimer’s disease research study showed that billions of dollars could be saved if physicians could intervene before someone becomes symptomatic. This positive net savings occurred with both drug treatment…  
    • In one study, Alzheimer’s patients who took donepezil had an increase in their prescription costs of $1,000 per patient, but saw reduced total medical costs of about 1/3–from $11,947 to…  
    • A study of rasagiline mesylate in Parkinson’s disease patients showed improved motor fluctuations and other Parkinson’s disease symptoms.  
    • In a study of different treatments for Parkinson’s disease, results showed that the disease can be managed for up to 5 years with a reduces risk of dyskinesia.  
    • One study found that dopaminergenic therapies for Parkinson’s disease patients resulted in lower dyskinesias as well as lower incidences of freezing, drowsiness, and edema–resulting in better quality-of-life through symptom control.  
    • Recent studies suggest that a low-fat diet which is rich in fruits and vegetables may support brain health. Other studies suggest that remaining socially active and intellectually engaged may also…  
    • Some studies have indicate that the management of high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, overweight or obesity, and other cardiovascular risk factors may help avoid or delay cognitive…  
    • Studies have shown that active medical management of Alzheimer’s disease can significantly improve quality-of-life for the individual through all stages of the disease.  
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved 5 drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. These drugs have been found to temporarily slow the worsening of Alzheimer’s symptoms for…  
    • A current drug in development addresses the underlying cause of type 2 diabetes by modulating genes responsible for insulin sensitization.  
    • A medicine is in development that aims to prevent or reverse Alzheimer’s disease progression by using a human monoclonal antibody specifically designed to remove beta amyloid protein from the brain.  
    • 32 drugs are currently in development for Parkinson’s disease.  
    • 91 medicines are currently in development for Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Valuing a QALY at $175,000, new drugs that would produce a 5-year delay in Alzheimer’s disease onset for all new cases between 2010 and 2050 would yield a benefit of…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, every $1 spent on Alzheimer’s research would save Medicare $10 by 2015 and $25 by 2025.  
    • According to one Parkinson’s expert, a 10% slowing of Parkinson’s disease progression would save $327 million per year.  
    • Delaying the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease would reduce the projected number of people with moderate to severe cases of the disase to 4.4 million instead of 10.3 million…  
    • “If you or a loved one started exhibiting symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease 12 years ago, there were no medicines for you to take. All you could do was hope–that…  
    • The present value QUALY gains associated with a new drug that by 2010 could delay disease onset by 1, 3, and 5 years. The dollar value estimates range from approximately…  
    • Combining gains in health-related knowledge of Alzheimer’s disease and its application for both genders, reductions in mortality between 1970 and 2000 yielded additional life-years with an end of century value…  
    • It is imperative to weigh costs of implementing new technologies for predicting onset of Alzheimer’s disease through biomarkers and delaying onset earlier against the potential benefits of improving health. Overall…  
    • 2006 Medicines in Development for Neurologic Disorders  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, one of the most promising medicines in development is to treat Alzheimer’s disease. The medicine inhibits plaque formation and blocks the…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, one of the most promising medicines in development uses normal human cells to enhance brain levels of dopamine, the neurotransmitter deficient…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, 42 medicines are currently in development for Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, 21 new medicines are currently in development for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, because of medical research, the number of Americans with Alzheimer’s could decrease by 3 million in 2025.  
    • Studies by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) at NIH are looking at the neuroprotective qualities of diets rich in B vitamins and antioxidant phytochemicals. These nutrients…  
    • Current research supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disease Orders and Stroke (NINDS) at NIH is using animal models to study progression of the disease and develop new drugs…  
    • In one study, despite a 4-fold increase in prescription drug spending, overall health spending for Alzheimer’s patients undergoing drug therapy went down by 1/3.  
    • Based on rates of admission in 1998, delaying admission of Alzheimer’s patients to nursing homes by 1 month could save as much as $1.12 billion a year.  
    • Delaying the onset of Alzheimer’s by only 5 years could reduce the number of people with Alzheimer’s by almost 50% after 50 years.  
    • Use of existing or new drugs/compounds for Alzheimer’s prevention could result in a delay of onset of between 2 and 5 years.  
    • In one study, deep-brain stimulation for Parkinson’s patients significantly reduced their required dosages of antiparkinsonian medications, consequently decreasing their medication costs by 32% 1 year after surgery, and 39% 2…  
    • Research shows that use of donepezil leads to a 4-fold increase in drug costs; however, it significantly lowers overall medical costs, reducing medical treatment and prescription drug costs by $3,891…  
    • Medicines Allow Patients to Remain Independent Longer: New Alzheimer’s medicine delays need for costly home care  
    • More Effective Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease Could Save Billions: Combined Medicare and Medicaid savings from effective treatment of Alzheimer’s diease  
    • Donepezil, a new Alzheimer’s medication, increased prescription costs to $1,000 per patient, however the overall health care costs decreased from $11,947 to $8,056.  
    • Researchers have found how to manipulate embryonic stem cells to form dopamine-producing brain cells. This new source of cells could someday be used to replace cells lost to Parkinson’s.  
    • A $1 billion-investment in Alzheimer’s research that led to research breakthroughs by 2010 could have a 10-to-1 return by 2015, and a 90-to-1 return by 2050.  
    • Research breakthroughs that slow the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease could achieve annual Medicare savings of $51 billion by 2015, $126 billion by 2025, and $444 billion by 2050.  
    • Galantamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, delays Alzheimer’s patients’ need for full-time care, with overall cost savings estimated between $323 and $4,256 per patient.  
    • A clinical trial in Europe found that treating Alzheimer’s patients with an Alzheimer’s drug reduced annual treatment costs by $1,000 per patient.  
    • Deep brain stimulation, an electrical signal delivered deep inside the brain, provides significant symptomatic relief for Parkinson’s patients whose medication is no longer effective.  
    • Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, has been found to slow progression of Alzheimer’s disease in its early stages, delaying the need for nursing home care by an average of 30 months.  
    • A recent study showed that memantine, a medicine approved to treat moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s, significantly slows cognitive decline and reduces the need for caregiving by 45.8 hours per month.  
    • Willena is 75 and was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease five years ago Her daughter and primary caregiver, Wanda
      “Willena is 75 and was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease five years ago. Her daughter and primary caregiver, Wanda Richardson, believes that her mother went undiagnosed for at least 15 years…