Neurological Disease

The prevalence of diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are skyrocketing as our population ages and they threaten to bankrupt our economy if better treatments and cures aren't found.  5.4 million Americans are currently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. This number will triple to 16 million by the year 2050. Parkinson’s disease affects 1 million Americans, with at least 60,000 new cases occurring each year.

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    • For families of loved ones with dementia, their out-of-pocket spending in the last 5 years before death was $61,522 compared to $34,068 without dementia.  Informal costs were $83,022 for people…  
    • Medicaid expenditures for people who died of dementia were $35,346 in the 5 years before death, compared to $4,552 for those without dementia.  
    • Spending on dementia
      Health care spending for dementia patients in their last 5 years of life is more than $250,000 per person.  This is 57% greater than costs associated with death from other…  
    • Average informal care costs over a five year period were estimated to be $83,022 for people with dementia vs. $38,272 fo
      Average informal care costs over a five year period were estimated to be $83,022 for people with dementia vs. $38,272 for those without dementia.  
    • Average out-of-pocket spending over a five year period for those with dementia was $61,522 compared to $34,068 for those
      Average out-of-pocket spending over a five year period for those with dementia was $61,522 compared to $34,068 for those without dementia.  
    • Between 2005 and 2010, total health care spending for people with dementia was more than $287,000 per person, nearly 60
      Between 2005 and 2010, total health care spending for people with dementia was more than $287,000 per person, nearly 60% percent greater than costs associated with death from other diseases, such as cancer…  
    • Close to half (48%) of all Parkinson’s patients report having suffered a fall.  
    • The cost of nursing homes for Parkinson’s patients totaled $5 billion in 2010.  
    • Medical expenses for Parkinson’s alone costs $8.1 billion or $12,800 per person in 2010.  
    • By 2040, it is projected that the number of people diagnosed with Parkinson’s will double from 630,000 in 2010.  
    • Therapeutic surgery for those with Parkinson’s can cost approximately $100,000 per patient.  
    • Parkinson’s disease cost our nation $25 billion each year in direct and indirect costs.  
    • Parkinson’s disease is the 14th leading cause of death in the U.S.  
    • 1 million Americans have Parkinson’s disease.  
    • Every year, 50,000 to 60,000 people are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.  
    • Uncompensated care for Alzheimer’s patients costs $150 billion per year.  
    • Home health aides for Alzheimer’s can cost about $21/hr.  
    • Assisted living facilities for those with Alzeimer’s can cost families up to $38,000 per year.  
    • It costs an average of $4,766 more on healthcare per year for family caregivers who are caring for someone with Alzheimer’s compared to non-caregivers.  
    • Medicaid recipients with Alzheimer’s disease have spending that is 9 times higher than for those without the disease.  
    • Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s disease have payments that are 3 times higher than beneficiaries without the disease.  
    • 1 in 2 people over the age of 85 has Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • After the age of 65, the rate of people who develops Alzheimers doubles every 5 years.  
    • In 2050, it is estimated that a person develop Alzheimer’s every 33 seconds.  
    • Every 68 seconds someone develops Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • By 2050, the number of adults with age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease will nearly triple–reaching 13.8 million.  
    • In 2012, Alzheimer’s disease costs up to $216 billion in care value.  
    • There are 15.4 million caregivers for people with Alzheimer’s disease in 2012.  
    • In 2013 there were 5.3 million Americans with Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Alzheimer’s is the 6th leading cause of death in the U.S.  
    • Alzheimer’s disease cost $203 billion in 2013.  
    • If the progression of Parkinson’s disease were slowed by 50%, there would be a 35% reduction in excess costs.  
    • 26,000 hospice days in 2010 were attributable to Parkinson’s disease.  
    • 24,000 home health days in 2010 were attributable to Parkinson’s disease.  
    • 31,000 emergency department visits in 2010 were attributable to Parkinson’s disease.  
    • 57,000 outpatient visits in 2010 were attributable to Parkinson’s disease.  
    • 1.26 million physician office visits in 2010 were attributable to Parkinson’s disease.  
    • In 2010, Parkinson’s disease was the cause of 1.9 million hospital inpatient days–73% more than is expected for a population without the disease.  
    • In addition to the estimated $14.4 billion a year in costs for Parkinson’s disease to the nation, an additional $6.3 billion in indirect costs (missed work or loss of job…  
    • The prevalence of Parkinson’s disease is expected to more than double between 2010 and 2040.  
    • Individuals with Parkinson’s disease in 2010 incurred medical expenses of $22,800 per patient (in PD-related expenses)–$12,800 higher than someone without the disease.  
    • The national economic burden of Parkinson’s disease in 20130 exceeded $14.4 billion–approximately $22,800 per patient.  
    • Alzheimers disease caregiver hospital or emergency room visits doubled from beginning to end of an 18-month study to the finish, from 6.3 stays to 12.5 total visits per 100 caregivers.  
    • Physician visits were nearly triple for Alzheimer’s disease caregivers when compared to non-caregivers (95.5 per month/100 contrasted to 34.3 per month/100).  
    • Emergency room use was twice as high for Alzheimer’s disease caregivers as for similar aged non-caregiving women (2.6 visits per month/100 women contrasted with 5.5 visits per month/100 caregivers).  
    • Over the course of an 18-month study, Alzheimer’s disease caregivers showed a 25% increase in the utilization of all types of health care services.  
    • A caregiver providing care for an individual with Alzheimer’s disease on average costs $4,766 more in health care service per year (per person) than a non-caregiver.  
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved five drugs that temporarily improve Alzheimer’s disease symptoms.  
    • When the first wave of baby boomers reaches age 85 (in 2031), an estimated 3.5 million people age 85 and older will have Alzheimer’s.  
    • By 2050, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease may triple, from 5.2 million to a projected 11 million to 16 million, barring the development of medical…  
    • By 2025, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease is estimated to reach 6.7 million— a 30 percent increase from the 5.2 million age 65 and…  
    • In 2000, there were an estimated 411,000 new cases of Alzheimer’s disease. For 2010, that number was estimated to be 454,000 (a 10% increase); by 2030, it is projected to…  
    • Because of the increase in the number of people over 65 in the United States, the annual incidence and other dementias is projected to double by 2050.  
    • In 2009, 6% of all people admitted to hospices in the United States had a primary hospice diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • An estimated 60 to 70 percent of older adults with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias live in the community compared with 98 percent of older adults without Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.  
    • In 2009, 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s and other dementias also had coronary heart disease, 29 percent also had diabetes, 22 percent also had congestive heart failure,…  
    • Over 15 million Americans provide unpaid care for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias.  
    • Between 2000 and 2008, deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s disease increased 66 percent, while those attributed to the number one cause of death, heart disease, decreased 13 percent.  
    • Based on 2008 final data from the National Center for Health Statistics, Alzheimer’s was reported as the underlying cause of death for 82,435 people.  
    • Total Medicaid spending for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is projected to be $35.5 billion in 2012.  
    • Aggregate payments for health care, long-term care and hospice for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are projected to increase from $200 billion in 2012 to $1.1 trillion in 2050 (in 2012 dollars).  
    • It is projected that the United States will need an additional 3.5 million health care providers by 2030 just to maintain the current ratio of health care workers to the population.  
    • In 2012, total out-of-pocket spending for individuals with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is estimated at $33.8 billion  
    • In 2008, Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s and other dementias paid $9,368 out-of-pocket on average for health care and long-term care services that were not covered by additional sources.  
    • Medicaid paid $23,953 (in 2011 dollars) per person for Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s and other dementias living in a long-term care facility compared with $222 for those with the diagnosis…  
    • Among nursing home residents with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, 51 percent rely on Medicaid to help pay for their nursing home care.  
    • In 2011, the average cost for a nonmedical home health aide was $21 per hour, or $168 for an eight-hour day.  
    • In 2008, 23% of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias had at least one home health visit during the year, compared with 10% of Medicare beneficiaries without Alzheimer’s…  
    • In 2008, there were 349 skilled nursing facility stays per 1,000 beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s and other dementias compared with 39 stays per 1,000 beneficiaries for people without these conditions.  
    • In 2008, there were 780 hospital stays per 1,000 Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias compared with 234 hospital stays per 1,000 Medicare beneficiaries without these conditions.  
    • Total payments for Alzheimer’s disease in 2012 are estimated at $200 billion, including $140 billion for Medicare and Medicaid combined in 2012 dollars.  
    • 29% of older individuals withAlzheimer’s disease and other dementias who have Medicare also have Medicaid coverage, compared with 11% of individuals without dementia.  
    • The estimated  economic value of the care provided by family and other unpaid caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias was $210.5 billion in 2011.  
    • In 2011, the 15.2 million family and other unpaid caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias provided an estimated 17.4 billion hours of unpaid care.  
    • In 2008, average Medicaid payments per person for Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s and other dementias were 19 times as great as average Medicaid payments for Medicare…  
    • Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s and other dementias were three times as great as payments for other Medicare beneficiaries in the same age group ($43,847 per person for those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias compared…  
    • Eighty percent of Alzheimer’s care provided at home is delivered by family caregivers; fewer than 10 percent of older adults receive all of their care from paid workers.  
    • In 2011, Alzheimer’s caregivers provided an estimated 17.4 billion hours of unpaid care, a contribution to the nation valued at over $210 billion.  
    • Nearly half of people age 85 and older (45%) have Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • One in eight people age 65 and older (13%) has Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • In 2012, the 85-years-and-older population includes about 2.5 million people with Alzheimer’s disease, or 48 percent of the Alzheimer’s population age 65 and older.  
    • By the middle of the century, someone in America will develop Alzheimer’s disease every 33 seconds.  
    • Every 68 seconds, someone in America develops Alzheimer’s disease.   
    • The estimated annual incidence of Alzheimer’s disease appears to increase dramatically with age, from approximately 53 new cases per 1,000 people age 65 to 74, to 170 new cases per…  
    • 16% of women age 71 and older have Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias compared with 11% of men.  
    • Of the 5.2 million people over age 65 with Alzheimer’s in the United States, 3.4 million are women and 1.8 million are men.  
    • Of those with Alzheimer’s disease, an estimated 4 percent are under age 65, 6 percent are 65 to 74, 44 percent are 75 to 84, and 46 percent are 85…  
    • An estimated 5.4 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer’s disease in 2012, including 5.2 million people age 65 and older.  
    • Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common type of dementia; it accounts for an estimated 60 to 80 percent of cases.  
    • The greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease is advancing age, but Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging.  
    • Sixty-four percent of Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 years living in a nursing home have Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.  
    • People with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias have greater than 3 times as many hospital stays as other older people.  
    • Studies indicate that people aged ≥65 years survive an average of 4 to 8 years after a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • 61% of people with Alzheimer’s disease at age 70 years are expected to die before age 80 years compared with 30% of people at age 70 years without Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Between 2000 and 2008, deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s disease increased 66%, whereas those attributed to heart disease— the number one cause of death— decreased 13%.  
    • Alzheimer’s disease is the fifth leading cause of death for those aged ≥65 years.  
    • Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States  
    • By 2050, the number of people aged ≥65 years with Alzheimer’s disease may triple, from 5.2 million to a projected 11 to 16 million, barring the development of medical breakthroughs…  
    • By 2025, the number of people aged ≥65 years with Alzheimer’s disease is estimated to reach 6.7 million, a 30% increase from the 5.2 million aged ≥65 years currently affected.  
    • In 2000, there were an estimated 411,000 new cases of Alzheimer’s disease. For 2010, that number was estimated to be 454,000 (a 10% increase); by 2030, it is projected to…  
    • Because of the increase in the number of people aged >65 years in the United States, the annual incidence of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is projected to double by…  
    • Total Medicaid spending for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is projected to be $35.5 billion in 2012.  
    • For people with Alzheimer’s disease, aggregate payments for health care, long-term care, and hospice are projected to increase from $200 billion in 2012 to $1.1 trillion in 2050.  
    • Twenty-nine percent of older individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias who have Medicare also have Medicaid coverage, compared with 11% of individuals without dementia.  
    • When the first wave of baby boomers reaches age 85 years (in 2031), an estimated 3.5 million people aged ≥85 years will have Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • By mid-century, someone in America will develop Alzheimer’s disease every 33 seconds.  
    • Every 68 seconds, someone in America develops Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Of the 5.2 million people aged >65 years with Alzheimer’s disease in the United States, 3.4 million are women and 1.8 million are men.  
    • Nearly half of people aged ≥85 years (45%) have Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • One in eight people aged ≥65 years (13%) has Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • An estimated 5.4 million Americans of all ages will have Alzheimer’s disease in 2012.  
    • The estimated annual incidence of Alzheimer’s disease appears to increase dramatically with age, from approximately 53 new cases per 1,000 people aged 65 to 74 years, to 170 new cases…  
    • 43% of all of Genworth’s total claims in payment, and 49% of all claims dollars, are due to Alzheimer’s and other dementias.  
    • Projected Numbers of People Aged 65 and Over in the U.S. Population with Alzheimer’s Disease (in Millions) Using the U.S. Census Bureau Estimates of Population Growth*  
    • When the first of the baby boomers reach age 80 (2031), an estimated 3.5 million people age 85 and older will have Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • In 2010, the 85 and older population included around 2.4 million people with Alzheimer’s disease–or 47% of the Alzheimer’s population age 65 and older.  
    • In 2000, there were an estimated 411,000 new cases of Alzheimer’s disease.  That number grew to an estimated 454,000 in 2010 (a 10% increase).  By 2030, that number is projected…  
    • Framingham Estimated Liftime Risks for Alzheimer’s by Age and Sex  
    • The estimated lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease is: Nearly 1 in 5 for women (17.2%) One in 10 for men (9.1%)  
    • Currently someone in the U.S. develops Alzheime’s disease every 69 seconds.  By the middle of the century, that will increase to every 33 seconds.  
    • Every 69 seconds, someone in the U.S. develops Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Due to the growth of the over 65 population, the annual total number of new cases of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia is projected to double by 2050.  
    • The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease increases dramatically with age: From approximately 53 new cases per 1,000 people ages 65 to 74 To 170 new cases per 1,000 people ages 75 to 84 To…  
    • Of the 5.2 million Americans over age 65 with Alzheimer’s disease, 3.4 million are women and 1.8 million are men.  
    • An estimated 13.9% of Americans age 71 and older have Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Of those with Alzheimer’s disease, 4% are under age 65 6% are between the ages of 65 and 74 45% are between the ages of 75 and 84 45% are age 85 and older  
    • Close to half of all people over the age of 85 have Alzheimer’s disease (43%).  
    • In 2011, around 5.4 million Americans are estimated to have Alzheimer’s disease.  This includes 5.2 million people age 65 and older 200,000 under age 65 with younger-onset Alzheimer’s.  
    • In 2011, an estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • 1 in 8 older Americans has Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Around 75 – 100 experimental therapies that are aimed at slowing or stopping the progression of Alzheimer’s disease are currently in clinical trials.  
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved 5 drugs that have proven to temporarily slow the worsening of Alzheimer’s disease symptoms for an average of 6 – 12 months…  
    • Alzheimer’s Disease was the #5 cause of death for those over 65 in 2006 with 177 per 100,000 people.  
    • An Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that slowed progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce Medicaid costs for people with the disease by $14 billion in 2020–from…  
    • An Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that slowed its progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce the total costs of care for people with the disease by…  
    • An Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that slowed its progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce the Medicare costs for people with the disease in 2050 by…  
    • An Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that slowed its progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce the Medicare costs for people with the disease by $20 billion…  
    • A treatment breakthrough that slowed the progression of Alzheimer’s disease would reduce the number of people with the disease from 2.4 million to 1.1 million in 2020, and from 6.5…  
    • Impact of Slowed Progression on Severe Stage, Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s, 2010-2050  
    • The federal share of Medicaid costs for nursing home care of Alzheimer’s disease residents will be $17 billion in 2010 and $85 billion in 2050.  The state share will be…  
    • Medicaid Nursing Home Costs, Delayed Onset  
    • Around half of all nursing home residents rely on Medicaid to help pay for their care.  In 2010, Medicaid costs for the nursing home care of Alzheimer’s patients will be…  
    • An Alzheimer’s treatment breakthrough that slowed progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce out-of-pocket costs to people with the disease by $25 billion in 2050–from the…  
    • An Alzheimer’s treatment breakthrough that slowed progression and began to show its effects in 2015, would reduce out-of-pocket costs to people with the disease by $8 billion in 2020–from the…  
    • An Alzheimer’s treatment breakthrough that slowed disease progression and began to show effects in 2015, would reduce Medicaid costs for people with the disease by $62 billion–from the expected $178…  
    • Out-of-Pocket Costs, Slowed Progression  
    • Medicaid Costs, Slowed Progression  
    • Medicare Costs, Slowed Progression  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2050 out-of-pocket costs for individuals and families dealing with the…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2020 out-of-pocket costs to individuals and families dealing with the…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2020 Medicaid costs for people with the disease would be…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2050 Medicare costs for people with the disease would be…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2020 Medicare costs for people with the disease would be…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years were introduced in 2015, by 2050 the total reduction in cost of care for people…  
    • If an Alzheimer’s disease treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset by 5 years was introduced in 2015, by 2020 total cost of care (for all payers) for all people…  
    • A treatment that delayed the age of onset of Alzheimer’s disease by five years would reduce the proportion of Americans age 65 and older with the disease from 10% to…  
    • Impact of Slowed Progression by Stage of Disease, Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s Disease, 2050  
    • Impact of Slowed Progression on Alzheimer’s Disease Growth, Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s, 2010-2050  
    • Out-of-Pocket Costs, 5-Year Delayed Onset  
    • Medicaid Costs, 5-Year Delayed Onset  
    • Medicare Costs, 5-Year Delayed Onset  
    • Impact of a 5-Year Delay in Onset on Costs, Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzhemier’s Disease, 2010-2050  
    • Impact of a 5-Year Delay in Onset by Stage of Disease, Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s Disease, 2050  
    • Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s Disease, 2010–2050  
    • “A treatment breakthrough that delayed the age of onset of Alzheimer’s disease by five years and began to show its effects in 2015 would decrease the total number of Americans…  
    • The costs to other payers (beyond Medicare, Medicaid, and out-of-pocket) will increase more than 400% between 2010 and 2050–from $22 billion to $117 billion.  
    • The out-of-pocket costs to people with Alzheimer’s disease will increase more than 400% between 2010 and 2050–from $30 billion to $157 billion.  
    • Medicaid costs for people with Alzheimer’s will increase 400% between 2010 and 2050–from $34 billion to $178 billion.  
    • Medicare costs for people with Alzheimer’s will increase more than 600% between 2010 and 2050–from $88 billion to $627 billion.  
    • Costs of Care for Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias, 2010–2050  
    • Between 2010 and 2050, the proportion of people with Alzheimer’s disese age 65 and older who are in the severe stage of the disease, will increase from 41 to 48%.   
    • By 2050, around 16% of Americans age 65 and older are projected to have Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Number of Americans Age 65 and Older with Alzheimer’s Disease, 2010 – 2050  
    • In 2009, around 11 million Americans provided 12.5 billion hours of unpaid care for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.  
    • Between 2010 and 2050, the total costs of caring for Americans with Alzheimer’s disease–age 65 and older–will increase 5-fold–from $172 billion to $1.08 trillion each year.  These figures include the…  
    • Cost of Care for People with Alzheimer’s Disease  
    • In 2004, total per person payments from all sources for health care, long-term care and hospice were 3 times higher for Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older with Alzheimer’s and…  
    • About 2.4 million Americans age 85 and older have Alzheimer’s disease (47% of the Alzheimer’s population 65 and older). When the first wave of Baby Boomers reaches age 85 (year…  
    • Among nursing home residents in the U.S. with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, 51% relied on Medicaid to help pay for their nursing home care in 2000.  
    • One study approximated that in 2002, employees who were caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias cost U.S. businesses $36.5 billion.  
    • Americans with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias have more than 3 times as many hospital stays as other older people.  
    • In 2008, 9.9 million Americans provides unpaid care for a family member, friend, or neighbor with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias–more than 1/4 of all unpaid caregivers of older adults…  
    • Currently, someone develops Alzheimer’s disease every 70 seconds. By the middle of this century, that number could be as frequent as every 33 seconds.  
    • One in 8 people age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease–13% of the 65 and older population.  
    • Every 70 seconds, someone in the U.S. develops Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Approximately 5.1 million Americans age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Approximately 5.3 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • In 2005, the total annual per person costs for patients with Parkinson’s disease was $23,101 in direct costs and $25,326 in indirect costs.  
    • Parkinson’s disease patients use significantly more health care services in all categories and pay more out-of-pocket for their medical services than other seniors–averaging $18,528 in annual health care expenses versus…  
    • Of those Parkinson’s patients with private insurance (including those who also had Medicare), total annual healthcare expenditures were $16,634 per patient (in 2002 dollars). This figure was 2.5 times the…  
    • About 34% of Parkinson’s patients received informal care. The caregiver contributed an average of 22 hours of care per week.  
    • Direct medical costs of Parkinson’s disease are more than double costs of those without the disease by 5 years after diagnosis.  
    • In late stage Parkinson’s disease, as much as 80% of total costs of disease are due to indirect costs such as loss of income from patient and caregivers and poor…  
    • In 2005, the total annual direct and indirect costs to the nation for Parkinson’s disease was projected to be at least $23 billion.  
    • In 2000, there were an estimated 411,000 new cases of Alzheimer’s disease. By 2010, that number is expected to increase to nearly half a million new cases each year (454,000),…  
    • Across the country, many states and regions are expected to see double-digit percentage increases in the number of people with Alzheimer’s disease–some over 100%–between 2000 and 2025.  
    • In 2008, the economic value of care provided by an unpaid caregiver of someone with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia was $94 billion.  
    • In 2004, the average per person payments for hospice care of beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia were 8 times higher than for other beneficiaries…  
    • Out-of-pocket costs for Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias who were living in the community were 1.2 times higher than the average for all…  
    • In Alzheimer’s special care units or wings of nursing homes, the average cost for a private room in 2008 was $219 a day and $79,935 a year. The average cost…  
    • In 2008, 52% of assisted living facilities provided specialized Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia care–charging an average of $4,267 a month and $51,204 a year.  
    • In 2004, average Medicaid payments per person for Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias were more than 9 times as high as the average…  
    • In 2004, total per-person payments for Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias (including all sources for health and long-term care) were $33,007–compared to $10,603…  
    • Alzheimer’s disease triples the healthcare costs of Americans age 65 and older.  
    • In 2005, the direct costs to Medicare and Medicaid for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, plus the estimated indirect costs to businesses of employees who were caregivers to…  
    • A large set of NIH clinical trials are assessing interventions (including dietary supplements–creatine and coenzyme Q10) that may slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease.  
    • A new study reports that using optogenetics, stimulating specific brain cells using light, may provide better results for Parkinson’s patients than traditional deep brain stimulation because of the ability to…  
    • One study shows that electrical spinal cord stimulation significantly improved motor function in an animal model of Parkinson’s disease.  
    • A study of Parkinson’s disease treatments found that pramipexole is a cost-effective treatment for early and advanced Parkinson’s disease. The total cost-effectiveness ratio was $8,837/QALY for patients with early Parkinson’s…  
    • Slowing the progression of Parkinson’s disease by just 10% would save $327 million (in direct and indirect costs) to the U.S. annually.  
    • An Alzheimer’s disease research study showed that billions of dollars could be saved if physicians could intervene before someone becomes symptomatic. This positive net savings occurred with both drug treatment…  
    • In one study, Alzheimer’s patients who took donepezil had an increase in their prescription costs of $1,000 per patient, but saw reduced total medical costs of about 1/3–from $11,947 to…  
    • A study of rasagiline mesylate in Parkinson’s disease patients showed improved motor fluctuations and other Parkinson’s disease symptoms.  
    • In a study of different treatments for Parkinson’s disease, results showed that the disease can be managed for up to 5 years with a reduces risk of dyskinesia.  
    • One study found that dopaminergenic therapies for Parkinson’s disease patients resulted in lower dyskinesias as well as lower incidences of freezing, drowsiness, and edema–resulting in better quality-of-life through symptom control.  
    • Recent studies suggest that a low-fat diet which is rich in fruits and vegetables may support brain health. Other studies suggest that remaining socially active and intellectually engaged may also…  
    • Some studies have indicate that the management of high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, overweight or obesity, and other cardiovascular risk factors may help avoid or delay cognitive…  
    • Studies have shown that active medical management of Alzheimer’s disease can significantly improve quality-of-life for the individual through all stages of the disease.  
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved 5 drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. These drugs have been found to temporarily slow the worsening of Alzheimer’s symptoms for…  
    • The number of people with Parkinson’s disease in the U.S. is expected to double between 2005 and 2030.  
    • Between 2005 and 2030, the prevalence of Parkinson’s disease is projected to almost double.  
    • Health-related-quality-of-life (HRQOL) is severely affected in Parkinson’s disease. In a study of veterans, HRQOL was more impaired in Parkinson’s disease than in those with any other condition.  
    • Among nursing home residents with Parkinson’s disease, 3-year mortality was 50%.  
    • Patients with Parkinson’s disease have twice the risk of suffering a fracture, and more than 3 times the risk of a hip fracture.  
    • Patients with Parkinson’s disease account for between 2.2% and 6.8% of the nursing home population in the U.S.  
    • Major depression is present in around 20-40% of Parkinson’s disease patients.  
    • More than 3/4 of Parkinson’s disease patients developed dementia during an 8-year study.  
    • Each year, around 68% of Parkinson’s disease patients suffer from falls.  
    • The risk of death in people with Parkinson’s disease is 1.6 times that of the general population.  
    • In the year before a person’s death, half of family caregivers of someone with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia reported spending at least 46 hours per week providing care–59% of…  
    • In 2005, the average length of hospice stays for Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s disease was 99 days.  
    • In 2007, around 10% of all hospice admissions were for people with a primary diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia.  
    • Various studies estimate that 40-67% of assisted living facility residents have Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias.  
    • At any given time, around 1/4 of all hospital patients age 65 and older are individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.  
    • Severe Alzheimer’s disease can cause problems with mobility, eating and breathing. These complications can significantly increase risk for pneumonia–the most commonly identified cause of death in end-stage Alzheimer’s patients.  
    • The prevalence of Parkinson’s disease increase dramatically with age. For every 100,000 Americans, 6,317 people age 80 and over have the disease, compared with 2,785 aged 70-80 and 704 aged…  
    • The incidence of Parkinson’s disease rapidly increases over the age of 60 years–with only 4% of cases occurring under the age of 50.  
    • The average diagnosis age for Parkinson’s disease in the U.S. is 70.5 years.  
    • The lifetime risk at birth of developing Parkinson’s disease is around 2% for men and 1.3% for women.  
    • Every 9 minutes, someone in the U.S. is diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease–60,000 new cases every year.  
    • An estimated 1.5 million Americans currently have Parkinson’s disease.  
    • Parkinson’s disease is the 2nd-most common neurodegenerative disease in the U.S., second only to Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • As many as 411,000 new cases of Alzheimer’s disease are diagnosed every year.  
    • Alzheimer’s disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the U.S.  
    • A current drug in development addresses the underlying cause of type 2 diabetes by modulating genes responsible for insulin sensitization.  
    • A medicine is in development that aims to prevent or reverse Alzheimer’s disease progression by using a human monoclonal antibody specifically designed to remove beta amyloid protein from the brain.  
    • 32 drugs are currently in development for Parkinson’s disease.  
    • 91 medicines are currently in development for Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Baby boomers start turning 65 in 2011, which puts them at the greatest risk for Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Alzheimer’s disease is the 5th leading cause of death in Americans age 65 and older.  
    • Around 14 million baby boomers can expect to develop dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Around 10 million of the 78 million U.S. baby boomers who are alive today can expect to develop Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • 1 in 6 women and 1 in 10 men who live to be at least 55 years old will develop Alzheimer’s disease in their lifetime.  
    • Alzheimer’s disease was the 7th-leading cause of death for people of all ages and the 5th-leading cause of death for people age 65 and over.  
    • In 2005, Alzheimer’s disease was listed as the underlying cause of death for 71,696 Americans.  
    • The death rate from Alzheimer’s disease for those aged 85 and over increased by 22.6% between 2000 and 2004.  
    • “When baby boomers begin to reach the median age for admission to a nursing home in 2025, Medicaid spending for nursing home residents with Alzheimer’s disease will increase rapidly, from…  
    • In 2000, 29% of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias were also Medicaid beneficiaries.  
    • In June 2007, 46.4% of all nursing home residents had Alzheimer’s or another dementia.  
    • A study of disease severity in 2003 showed that about 60% of assisted living residents with dementia were in the moderate or severe stages of the disease.  
    • In 2000, total Medicare costs per person for beneficiaries with diabetes and Alzheimer’s or another dementia were $19,994, compared with $8,011 for beneficiaries with diabetes but no Alzheimer’s or other…  
    • 30% of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and over who have Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias also have coronary heart disease and 28% have congestive heart failure.  
    • At any time, about 25% of older hospital patients are people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.  
    • “In 2000, Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and over with Alzheimer’s and other dementias had an average of 1.3 times more physician visits than did other Medicare beneficiaries in the same…  
    • “In 2000, Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and over with Alzheimer’s and other dementias were 3.4 times more likely than other Medicare beneficiaries in the same age group to have a…  
    • Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias cost state and federal Medicaid $21 billion in nursing home care in 2005, which is projected to increase to $24 billion in 2010 and $27…  
    • In 2005, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias cost Medicare $91 billion, which is projected to increase to $160 billion by 2010 and $189 billion by 2015.  
    • In 2007, the value of care provided by unpaid caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias was $89 billion.  
    • In 2007, the 9.8 million family and other unpaid caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias provided 8.4 billion hours of care.  
    • 29% of all unpaid caregivers of older people in the U.S. are caring for a person with Alzheimer’s or another dementia.  
    • 9.8 million family members, friends and neighbors provided unpaid care for someone diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia in 2007.  
    • Close to 10 million Americans provide unpaid care for people with dementia. In 2007, they provided 8.4 billion hours of unpaid care, valued at $89 million.  
    • By 2050, more than 60% of people with Alzheimer’s disease will be age 85 or older.  
    • By 2050, the number of individuals age 65 and over with Alzheimer’s could range from 11 million to 16 million.  
    • There were an estimated 411,000 new cases of Alzheimer’s disease in 2000. That number is expected to increase to 454,000 new cases a year by 2010, 615,000 new cases a year…  
    • Currently, a person in the U.S. develops Alzheimer’s disease every 71 seconds. This will increase to every 33 seconds by the middle of this century.  
    • About 5.2 million people in the U.S. have Alzheimer’s disease in 2008.  
    • Advancing age is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. A majority of Americans that are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease are 65 or older.  
    • Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60% to 80% of all dementia diagnoses.  
    • Valuing a QALY at $175,000, new drugs that would produce a 5-year delay in Alzheimer’s disease onset for all new cases between 2010 and 2050 would yield a benefit of…  
    • Dementia prevalence was found to increase with age, from 5% of those Americans aged 71-79 years to 37.4% of those aged 90 and older.  
    • In 2002, the prevalence of dementia among individuals aged 71 and older was approximately 3.4 million Americans.  
    • 15% of Americans with Parkinson’s disease are diagnosed before the age of 50–incidence increases with age.  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, every $1 spent on Alzheimer’s research would save Medicare $10 by 2015 and $25 by 2025.  
    • According to one Parkinson’s expert, a 10% slowing of Parkinson’s disease progression would save $327 million per year.  
    • Delaying the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease would reduce the projected number of people with moderate to severe cases of the disase to 4.4 million instead of 10.3 million…  
    • “If you or a loved one started exhibiting symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease 12 years ago, there were no medicines for you to take. All you could do was hope–that…  
    • In 2002, community-living older individuals who used paid services used almost double the number of hours monthly (200 hours) compared to those who had no cognitive impairment (108 hours).  
    • Beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s disease account for 34% of Medicare spending but make up only 12.8% of the 65 and older population.  
    • The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that there are between 220,000 and 640,000 Americans age 55 to 64 with early onset Alzheimer’s and other dementias.  
    • State and Federal Medicaid spending will increase from $19 billion in 2000 to $118 billion in 2050.  
    • Total Medicare spending on treating beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s disease will increase from $62 billion in 2000 to $189 billion in 2015. By 2050, Medicare will be spending more than $1…  
    • The size of the U.S. population age 65 and older will double over the next 25 years, growing to 70 million by 2030 when the youngest of the baby boomers…  
    • There will be a 44% increase in Americans with Alzheimer’s disease by 2025.  
    • By 2030, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease is estimated to be about 7.7 million, which is more than a 50% increase over the number…  
    • The present value QUALY gains associated with a new drug that by 2010 could delay disease onset by 1, 3, and 5 years. The dollar value estimates range from approximately…  
    • As the prevalence and impact of Alzheimer’s disease grows, so does the cost to the nation. The direct and indirect cost of Alzheimer’s and other dementias amount to more than…  
    • By mid-century, the number of people with Alzheimer’s disease is expected to grow to as many as 16 million, which is more than the current total population of New York…  
    • Combining gains in health-related knowledge of Alzheimer’s disease and its application for both genders, reductions in mortality between 1970 and 2000 yielded additional life-years with an end of century value…  
    • It is imperative to weigh costs of implementing new technologies for predicting onset of Alzheimer’s disease through biomarkers and delaying onset earlier against the potential benefits of improving health. Overall…  
    • 2006 Medicines in Development for Neurologic Disorders  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, one of the most promising medicines in development is to treat Alzheimer’s disease. The medicine inhibits plaque formation and blocks the…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, one of the most promising medicines in development uses normal human cells to enhance brain levels of dopamine, the neurotransmitter deficient…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, 42 medicines are currently in development for Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, 21 new medicines are currently in development for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, because of medical research, the number of Americans with Alzheimer’s could decrease by 3 million in 2025.  
    • Studies by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) at NIH are looking at the neuroprotective qualities of diets rich in B vitamins and antioxidant phytochemicals. These nutrients…  
    • A large set of clinical trials are assessing interventions (including dietary supplements– creatine and coenzyme Q10) that may slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease.  
    • Current research supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disease Orders and Stroke (NINDS) at NIH is using animal models to study progression of the disease and develop new drugs…  
    • Alzheimer’s disease drains more than $148 billion from the nation’s economy each year.  
    • Some individuals with Parkinson’s disease talk, walk, or act out dreams and nightmares in their sleep. The may inadvertently injure themselves or their bed partners in the process.  
    • Close to 1/3 of caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias now exercise less than before they started caregiving, compared to 1/4 of other caregivers.  
    • Almost 1/4 of caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias reported that caring for this individual was stressful, compared to 15% of other caregivers.  
    • In 2003, close to 1 in 4 caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias provided 40 hours a week or more of care. 71% provided this care for…  
    • For beneficiaries diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, state and federal nursing home care is expected to increase from $21 billion in 2005 to $24 billion in 2010, and $27…  
    • Medicare spending on beneficiaries diagnosed with dementias is projected to increase from $91 billion in 2005 to $160 billion by 2010, and $189 billion by 2015.  
    • In 2025, when baby boomers with severe disabilities or diseases–such as Alzheimer’s disease–reach the median age for nursing home care admission, Medicaid costs just for nursing home care will increase…  
    • The average progression from mild to severe Alzheimer’s disease is 6 years. At this time, a patient will be in need of care equivalent to placement in a health-related facility,…  
    • Lightheadedness, drooling, and difficulty swallowing can occur because of autonomic nervous system dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease.  
    • Many studies estimate that over 90% of Parkinson’s disease patients suffer from a type of sleep disturbance.  
    • At least 1/3 of patients with Parkinson’s disease develop cognitive impairment, which can be secondary to the disease itself.  
    • Psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety occur in 1/3 to 2/3 of Parkinson’s disease patients.  
    • The typical Alzheimer’s care recipient is 78 years old, female, and widowed. A full third of Alzheimer’s recipients (35%) are 85 years and older.  
    • Most Alzheimer’s caregivers are helping relatives–87%. The most common caregiver relationship is parent-child–57% are helping their mother, 36% are helping their mother-in-law, 11% are helping their father, and 29%…  
    • The majority of Alzheimer’s caregivers are women–59%.  
    • While many family caregivers for Alzheimer’s patients get help from other family members, only around 1/2 use any paid help or supportive services. Only 9% use respite services and…  
    • In 2004, Alzheimer’s moved from the eigth leading cause of death to the seventh–overtaking influenza and pneumonia.  
    • 1/4 of caregivers helping someone age 50 or older, report that the person they are caring for is suffering from Alzheimer’s, dementia, or other mental confusion.  
    • In one study, despite a 4-fold increase in prescription drug spending, overall health spending for Alzheimer’s patients undergoing drug therapy went down by 1/3.  
    • Based on rates of admission in 1998, delaying admission of Alzheimer’s patients to nursing homes by 1 month could save as much as $1.12 billion a year.  
    • Delaying the onset of Alzheimer’s by only 5 years could reduce the number of people with Alzheimer’s by almost 50% after 50 years.  
    • Use of existing or new drugs/compounds for Alzheimer’s prevention could result in a delay of onset of between 2 and 5 years.  
    • In one study, deep-brain stimulation for Parkinson’s patients significantly reduced their required dosages of antiparkinsonian medications, consequently decreasing their medication costs by 32% 1 year after surgery, and 39% 2…  
    • Research shows that use of donepezil leads to a 4-fold increase in drug costs; however, it significantly lowers overall medical costs, reducing medical treatment and prescription drug costs by $3,891…  
    • Medicare spending for those with Alzheimer’s disease will triple by 2015–to $189 billion from $62 billion in 2000. By 2050, Medicare will be spending more than $1 trillion on beneficiaries…  
    • As the United States population ages, researchers estimate that the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease will come close to quadrupling over the next 50 years, when 1 in 45 may be…  
    • Drug therapy for Parkinson’s disease costs more than $6 billion a year. Costs such as rehabilitation and home care can run as high as $150,000 per patient, per year.  
    • Almost 1/2 of all people with Alzheimer’s disease have 4 or more chronic conditions.  
    • Every 9 minutes a new Parkinson’s case is diagnosed–60,000 cases every year.  
    • Projected Alzheimer’s Disease Prevalence, 2000-2100  
    • Medicines Allow Patients to Remain Independent Longer: New Alzheimer’s medicine delays need for costly home care  
    • More Effective Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease Could Save Billions: Combined Medicare and Medicaid savings from effective treatment of Alzheimer’s diease  
    • Donepezil, a new Alzheimer’s medication, increased prescription costs to $1,000 per patient, however the overall health care costs decreased from $11,947 to $8,056.  
    • Average Medicare Costs for Beneficiaries Age 65+ with Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias Compared with Costs for Other Beneficiaries, 2000  
    • Average Medicare Costs for Hospital, Nursing Home and Home Health Care for Beneficiaries Age 65+ with Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias Compared with Other Beneficiaries, 2000  
    • Total business costs for Alzheimer’s disease, 1998 to 2002  
    • Percent of Medicare Beneficiaries Age 65+ with Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias Who Had Specified Coexisting Medical Conditions (1999)  
    • In 2002, nearly 1/3 of community-living older individuals with cognitive impairment who received daily activity assistance used paid services, which were usually combined with unpaid assistance. 12% of those who…  
    • Dementia is correlated with a significantly higher out-of-pocket expenditure for medical care compared with those who have normal cognitive function. In 1995, the annual out-of-pocket expenditure was $1,350 for Americans…  
    • Among the elderly, hospitalization of a spouse for dementia correlated to an increase risk of death for the partner that was not hospitalized. Among men, 8.6% died within a year…  
    • “8% of working caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementia turned down a promotion (4% of other caregivers), and 7% lost job benefits (3% for other caregivers).”  
    • Of caregivers who work, 2/3 who cared for people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias reported that they missed work, compared to 57% of other caregivers.  
    • Over 40% of caregivers who care for people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias report high levels of stress.  
    • In 2003, 65% of Alzheimer caregivers performed personal care that was physically demanding. These tasks can be made difficult by the person with dementia, who may be unable to help…  
    • Unpaid caregivers of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia provide the U.S. with an economic asset worth almost $83 billion in 2005.  
    • Almost 10 million (29%) of all caregivers of people age 60 and older are caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.  
    • Hospice admissions for Americans with dementia increased from 6.8% of all admissions in 2001 to 9.8% in 2005.  
    • In 2005, 50% of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease who were hospitalized for pneumonia or hip fracture died within 6 months. Patients without cognitive impairment were less likely to die after…  
    • In 2002, about 26% of older community-living adults with severe disabilities (cannot perform 3 or more daily activities) were cognitively impaired.  
    • In 2002, more than 9 out of 10 community-living older individuals with cognitive impairment received daily activity assistance from family, friends or paid workers. Slightly less than 50% of those…  
    • At least 50% of the elderly participants in adult day services have Alzheimer’s or another dementia.  
    • At least 50% of elderly residents of assisted living facilities have Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.  
    • About 47% of nursing home residents have a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or another dementia in their medical record.””  
    • About 70% of nursing home residents have some cognitive impairment.  
    • 70% of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias are cared for by family and friends at home.  
    • In 2002, Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older who had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or other dementias had to pay 37% of nursing home care costs out of pocket.  
    • In 2003, Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older who were diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or other dementias spent an average of $3,455 (22%) of their income on health care.  
    • “Costs to business for employees who are caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias amount to $36.5 billion. These costs result from lost productivity, missed work and costs to…  
    • Direct and indirect costs of Alzheimer’s and other dementias are more than $148 billion annually.  
    • 95% of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and over with Alzheimer’s and other dementias have at least one other chronic condition.””  
    • Medicare beneficiaries who were diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias visited a physician 1.3 times more frequently than other beneficiaries.  
    • Compared to a person who does not have dementia, the hospital costs for someone who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease were, on average, 3.2 times higher.  
    • Americans with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias have 3.4 times more hospital stays than the average for someone who does not have dementia.  
    • On average, Medicare spends about 3 times more per beneficiary diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or other dementias, compared to someone who does not have dementia ($13,207 compared to $4,454).  
    • Pneumonia and other infections were the most likely cause of hospitalization for nursing home residents who suffer from dementias, including Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • 60% of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with dementia also have hypertension. 30% of Americans with dementia have coronary artery disease.  
    • The typical first symptom of Alzheimer’s disease is memory loss for recent events.  
    • The number of Americans diagnosed with dementia is expected to more than double from 2.5 million in 2002 to 5.2 million in 2030.  
    • The typical Alzheimer’s caregiver is a woman, 48 years old, married, employed, without children at home, and with at least some college education.  
    • Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease often takes a financial toll on the caregiver. Among non-spouse caregivers, 49% provided financial assistance at an average of $218/month.  
    • Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease can take an enormous toll on the caregiver. 55% of caregivers have less time for other family members. 49% give up…  
    • Two-thirds of Alzheimer’s caregivers who also work, report that they missed work due to their caregiving responsibilities. 14% gave up work completely or chose early retirement. 13% cut…  
    • According to preliminary data, Parkinson’s disease was the 14th leading cause of death in the United States in 2004, causing 18,018 deaths.  
    • Based on preliminary data, Alzheimer’s disease was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2004, causing 65,829 deaths.  
    • In 2002, Alzheimer’s disease caused 58,289 deaths in people age 65 and older – 99% of all Alzeimer’s deaths that year.  
    • In 2002, Alzheimer’s disease caused 58,866 deaths.  
    • Community-dwelling elderly with mild dementia received an additional 8.5 hours per week of informal care compared to those with normal cognition. Those with moderate dementia received an additional 17.4 hours…  
    • The additional annual cost of informal caregiving per person was $3,630 for mild dementia, $7,420 for moderate dementia, and $17,700 for severe dementia. Total national annual cost of caregiving…  
    • Researchers have found how to manipulate embryonic stem cells to form dopamine-producing brain cells. This new source of cells could someday be used to replace cells lost to Parkinson’s.  
    • A $1 billion-investment in Alzheimer’s research that led to research breakthroughs by 2010 could have a 10-to-1 return by 2015, and a 90-to-1 return by 2050.  
    • Research breakthroughs that slow the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease could achieve annual Medicare savings of $51 billion by 2015, $126 billion by 2025, and $444 billion by 2050.  
    • Galantamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, delays Alzheimer’s patients’ need for full-time care, with overall cost savings estimated between $323 and $4,256 per patient.  
    • A clinical trial in Europe found that treating Alzheimer’s patients with an Alzheimer’s drug reduced annual treatment costs by $1,000 per patient.  
    • Deep brain stimulation, an electrical signal delivered deep inside the brain, provides significant symptomatic relief for Parkinson’s patients whose medication is no longer effective.  
    • Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, has been found to slow progression of Alzheimer’s disease in its early stages, delaying the need for nursing home care by an average of 30 months.  
    • A recent study showed that memantine, a medicine approved to treat moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s, significantly slows cognitive decline and reduces the need for caregiving by 45.8 hours per month.  
    • Willena is 75 and was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease five years ago Her daughter and primary caregiver, Wanda
      “Willena is 75 and was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease five years ago. Her daughter and primary caregiver, Wanda Richardson, believes that her mother went undiagnosed for at least 15 years…  
    • The number of Medicare claims for Alzheimer’s disease treatment grew by 250% during the 1990s, and is expected to increase by 300% over the next 10 years.  
    • By 2050, as many as 16 million people could be affected by Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • The single costs for assisted living and nursing home care of a single Parkinson’s patient can cost as much as $100,000 per year.  
    • Parkinson’s disease costs our society at least $25 billion annually.  
    • State and federal Medicaid spending on nursing home care for beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s disease was $19 billion in 2000.  
    • In 2005, Medicare spent $91 billion caring for those with Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • An estimated 33% of Parkinson’s patients suffer from falls; 13% fall more than once a week.  
    • As Parkinson’s progresses, substantial disability–including the inability to maintain balance, walk, speak, and move–makes assisted living and nursing home care necessary.  
    • By the time the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are apparent, as much as 80% of dopamine-producing cells have been damaged.  
    • The average age of onset for Parkinson’s is 60-years-old.  
    • As many as 1 million Americans suffer from Parkinson’s disease.  
    • Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the United States, second only to Alzheimer’s disease.