Diabetes

Despite recent advances, diabetes continues to be a major health threat for at least 29 million Americans who have it and the 86 million Americans with prediabetes. The biggest concerns for individuals with the disease are its many complications and co-morbidities; which can cause vision loss, heart disease, stroke, and other debilitating medical conditions. With the aging of the population and the rise in risk factors like obesity, these problems are going to skyrocket, making medical innovation more critical than ever.

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    • DR Treatment Savings in the US
      Every year, the U.S. saves an estimated $1.6 billion by treating DR.  
    • Economics of DR Treatment
      Laser treatment plus a VEGF inhibitor achieved an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $12,410 per quality adjusted life year in patients with DME.  
    • Mobile Exam for DR
      Use of a mobile examination for DR screening in Finland decreased visual impairment by 86% in the covered area.  
    • Remote Interpretation of Retinal Imaging for DR
      Use of remote interpretation of retinal imaging in diabetics sent via tele-ophthalmology, improved the frequency of screening from 32% to 71% in only 12 months.  
    • Tele-ophthalmology
      Adequately trained general practitioners can screen for DR with 90% sensitivity using tele-ophthalmology.  
    • Blood Pressure Control in Patients with Diabetes
      Tight blood pressure control in type 2 diabetes patients reduced progression of DR by 34% and risk of deterioration by 47% after 9 years.  
    • Anti-VEGF Letter Improvement
      An anti-VEGF therapy for DME improved vision by more than 15 letters in approximately 36-51% of participants in a trial.  
    • Anti-VEGF Visual Improvement
      Nearly 50% of DME patients who received an anti-VEGF drug, experienced substantial visual improvement after a year of injections.  
    • Laser Treatment for DR
      Laser treatment of PDR can reduce the 5-year risk of blindness by 90%, and the risk of visual loss from DME by 50%.  
    • Intensive Glycemic Control in People with Diabetes
      Intensive glycemic control in diabetics reduced their: Adjusted mean risk of DR by 76% Risk of progression by 54% Rates of laser surgery by 56% Risk of DME by 23%    
    • DR Treatment Reduced Risk of Blindness
      Appropriate treatment can reduce the risk of blindness or moderate vision loss from DR by more than 90%.  
    • Future Impact of DR
      The rise of DR will disproportionately impacting the poorest populations, since 80% of people with diabetes live in low-middle income countries.  
    • People Affected Worldwide by DR
      By 2030, more than 191 million people around the world will be affected by DR—56 million with vision-threatening DR.  
    • Annual Direct and Indirect Costs of Diabetic Retinopathy
       
    • DR Quality of Life
      A quality of life survey of legally blind DR patients found that 41% would be willing to trade their remaining years for perfect vision.  
    • Percent of Blindness in 2010 Due to DR by Region
       
    • World Blindess from DR
       
    • DR, A Leading Cause of Blindess
      DR is the one of the leading causes of blindness.  
    • Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy by Age, in the US
       
    • Global DR Prevalence
      The overall prevalence of global DR is 34.6%—6.96% for PDR, 6.81% for DME, and 10.2% for vision-threatening DR.  
    • Risk of DR
      The risk of DR increases the longer a person has diabetes.  More than 75% of people who have diabetes for more than 20 years will have some form of DR.  
    • Global DR Prevalence
      DR affects more than 126 million people around the world— 37 million with vision-threatening DR.  
    • Proportion of People with Diabetes with Diabetic Retinopathy of Any Severity, by Country
      Map figures are for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.  
    • Diabetes is the main source of visual impairment in individuals under age 65.  
    • Diabetes doubles the risk of liver, pancreas, and endometrial cancer  
    • Roughly 60-70% of diabetics develop nerve damage  
    • People with diabetes are at a 2-4 times higher risk of stroke than people without diabetes  
    • Adults who have diabetes are 2-4 times more likely to die of heart disease than adults without diabetes  
    • Upwards of 592 million people will have diabetes by 2035  
    • Every 6 seconds someone dies due to diabetes  
    • In 2013, 5.1 million Americans died due to diabetes  
    • In the U.S., about 11 million of the 25.6 million adults with diabetes are over 65 years of age  
    • Diabetes costs in the U.S. reached $245 billion in 2012  
    • Worldwide, diabetes costs reached $465 billion in 2011  
    • 90% of diabetes cases are Type II diabetes  
    • The use of insulin pumps create net cost savings, including $5886 annually per person affected and $34.9 million in increased tax revenue  
    • Over 25.8 million Americans are impacted by diabetes  
    • People with diabetes are 60% more likely to have cataracts, than adults without the disease.  
    • People with diabetes are 40% more likely to have glaucoma, than adults without the disease.  
    • Death rates are 1.5 times higher in adults with diabetes, than in adults without the disease.  
    • Deaths from diabetes are underreported with one study finding that only 35% to 40% of people with diabetes who died had the disease listed anywhere on their death certificate.  
    • In 2010, diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death – with more than 69,000 deaths with diabetes as the underlying cause of death, and more than 234,000 with diabetes…  
    • In 2010, around 73,000 lower-limb amputations were performed in adults with diagnosed diabetes. These amputations account for around 60% of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations in people age 20 and older.  
    • In 2011, diabetes was listed as the primary cause of kidney failure in 44% of all new cases; close to 50,000 people began treatment for kidney failure due to diabetes;…  
    • 4.2 million U.S. adults age 40 and older with diabetes, had diabetic retinopathy (from 2005 – 2008).  
    • Hospitalization rates for stroke are 1.5 times higher in adults with diabetes, than in adults without the disease.  
    • Hospitalization rates for heart attack are 1.8 times higher in adults with diabetes, than in adults without the disease.  
    • Death rates from cardiovascular disease are around 1.7 times higher in adults with diabetes, than in adults without the disease.  
    • From 2009 – 2012, 65% of adults with diabetes had high LDL cholesterol or used cholesterol-lowering medications.  
    • From 2009 – 2012, 71% of adults with diabetes had high blood pressure or used medications to lower their HBP.  
    • From 2009 – 2012, an estimated 86 million American adults had prediabetes—37% of adults age 20 and older, and 51% of adults age 65 and older.  
    • More than 29 million people in the U.S.—9.3% of the population, had diabetes in 2014.  Of those, 8 million people were undiagnosed.  
    • Older adults with diabetes
      About 23 percent of adults aged 60 or over have diabetes.    
    • In 2008, diabetes-related hospital costs totaled $83 billion.  
    • In 2034, there will be 14.1 million Americans who are diabetic and eligible for Medicare.  
    • In the next 25 years, the number of people with diabetes and the cost to treat them, will both at least double.  
    • In 2034, annual spending on diabetes will increase to $336 billion.  
    • In 2034 a projected 44.1 million Americans will be diagnosed with diabetes.  
    • Diabetes consumes 62.4 % of government health insurance (Medicare, Medicaid, and the military)  
    • 1 in every 5 health care dollars is spent on diabetes and its complications.  
    • Medical costs are about $13,700 per year for those diagnosed with diabetes, 2.3 times higher than those without diabetes.  
    • 13.7% of Americans aged 45-64 had diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes compared to 26.9% age 65 or older between 2005-2008.  
    • In 2010, there were 610,000 hospital discharges among adults with diabetes.  
    • Nearly 65,700 people with diabetes had lower-limb amputations in 2006.  
    • Between 60 and 70% of people with diabetes have had mid to high levels of neuropathy.  
    • Diabetes was responsible for 44% of new cases of kidney failure in 2008.  
    • Between 2005 and 2008, 4.2 million adults age 40 and older had diabetic retinopathy.  
    • Diabetes is a leading cause of blindness for individuals ages 20 to 74.  
    • Individuals diagnosed with diabetes have a 2 to 4 times higher risk of developing heart disease, than those without the disease.  
    • 25.8 million Americans–8.3% of the total population–have diabetes.  
    • In 2010, 1.9 million Americans age 20 and older were diagnosed with diabetes.  
    • 79 million Americans have pre-diabetes–a condition of higher-than-normal blood glucose levels that puts them at risk of developing diabetes.  
    • 7 million Americans are unaware that they have diabetes.  
    • In 2012, the total cost of diabetes was $245 billion–$176 billion in medical costs and $69 billion in lost productivity.  
    • In 2010, 18.8 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes.  
    • In 2010, 10.9 million Americans aged 65 years or older had diabetes.  
    • Detecting and treating diabetic eye disease with laser therapy can reduce the development of severe vision loss by an estimated 50% to 60%.  
    • In general, for every 10 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure, the risk for any complication related to diabetes is reduced by 12%.  
    • Blood pressure control reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (heart disease or stroke) among people with diabetes by 33% to 50%, and the risk of microvascular complications (eye, kidney, and…  
    • In 2006, about 65,700 nontraumatic lower-limb amputations were performed in people with diabetes.  
    • More than 60% of nontraumatic lower-limb amputations occur in people with diabetes.  
    • Almost 30% of people with diabetes aged 40 years or older have impaired sensation in the feet (i.e., at least one area that lacks feeling.)  
    • About 60% to 70% of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nervous system damage. The results of such damage include impaired sensation or pain in the feet…  
    • In 2008, an estimated 202,290 people with end-stage kidney disease due to diabetes, were living on chronic dialysis or with a kidney transplant.  
    • In 2008, 48,374 people with diabetes began treatment for end-stage kidney disease.  
    • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, accounting for 44% of all new cases of kidney failure in 2008.  
    • Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about 2 to 4 times higher than adults without diabetes.  
    • Overall, the risk for death among people with diabetes is about twice that of people of similar age but without diabetes.   
    • Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.  
    • About 1.9 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 in the United States.  
    • People with diabetes aged 60 years or older are 2–3 times more likely to report an inability to walk one-quarter of a mile, climb stairs, or do housework compared with…  
    • In 2004, heart disease was noted on 68% of diabetes-related death certificates among people aged 65 years or older.  
    • Among U.S. residents aged 65 years and older, 10.9 million, or 26.9%, had diabetes in 2010.  
    • Losing about 4 percent of your weight and keeping it off for the rest of your life could reduce your risk for a serious complication from diabetes or from dying…  
    • The number of diagnosed cases of diabetes in the United States will increase by 165 percent, from eleven million (4.0 percent prevalence) in 2000 to twenty-nine million (7.1 percent) by…  
    • Since 1980, the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes has more than doubled, rising from 2.8 percent of the USpopulation to 8.3 percent in 2010.  
    • The number of people age sixty-five and older who are diagnosed with diabetes in the United States is expected to increase by eight million in just ten years, from thirteen…  
    • Even conservative scenarios project that US diabetes prevalence will increase 50 percent by 2050.  
    • During 1997-2006, diabetes was the single biggest contributor to inflation-adjusted health care spending growth among Medicare beneficiaries.  
    • Approximately $1 in every $5 spent on health care in the United States goes to caring for someone with diagnosed diabetes, and 25 percent of Medicare’s annual budget is used…  
    • In 2010, diabetes-related health spending worldwide totaled $376 billion, corresponding to 12 percent of all health spending and $1,330 per person spent on diabetes.  
    • Up to 40 percent of adult Americans  with diabetes and 93 percent of those with prediabetes are unaware of their status.  
    • To date, multiple genomewide comparisons of thousands of subjects with type 2 diabetes and controls without the disease have identified approximately twenty-five DNA variants that are significantly associated with type…  
    • The increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes among people with a family history of the disease is estimated as two to six times greater than the risk among people…  
    • In 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that the US prevalence of diabetes was 8.3 percent.  
    • Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness, kidney failure, and lower-limb amputations not related to trauma.   
    • People with diabetes have a two- to fourfold increase in mortality related to heart disease and in risk for stroke, compared to people without the disease.  
    • Annual direct and indirect costs- including undiagnosed diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes- are expected to grow from $218 billion in 2007 to $336 billion by 2034.  
    • About 25 percent of those with prediabetes go on to develop diabetes within three to five years.  
    • New diagnoses of type 2 diabetes are expected to double to a projected rate of about 15 new cases per 1,000 Americans in 2050.  
    • Diabetes is more prevalent in people age sixty-five or older, with rates of disease equal to 26.9 percent, compared to those age twenty or older, with disease rates of 11.3…  
    • A person with diabetes can expect to lose more than $160,000 over his or her working life, compared to a peer without the disease.  
    • By age 30, a person with diabetes can expect a ten-percentage-point reduction in the likelihood of being employed and annual earnings penalties of up to $6,000 when employed.  
    • Roughly 38 percent of the adult population (about 100 million people) might have prediabetes in 2021- up from 29.7 percent in 2011.  
    • If current trends persist, it is estimated that 15.4 percent of American adults (40.3 million) might have diabetes by 2021, compared to 11.8 percent (28 million) in 2011.  
    • The Centers for Disease Control predicts that the prevalence of diabetes will rise from approximately one in ten adults today to between one in five and one in three adults…  
    • Annual health care spending attributable to prediabetes or diabetes could rise from $206 billion in 2011 to $512 billion by 2021, with a cumulative cost of approximately $3.5 trillion.  
    • Seniors with diagnosed diabetes in a large representative sample of United Healthcare’s Medicare Advantage members had average costs in 2009 that were 33 percent higher than those for the remainder…  
    • The average yearly total costs for a person with diabetes who developed complications were $20,700- almost three times the average cost of $7,800 for diabetes patients without complications.  
    • The average total annual cost for an adult plan member with employer coverage and diagnosed diabetes who interacted with the health care system in 2009 was approximately $11,700, compared to…  
    • Health care spending attributable to diabetes is expected to nearly triple by 2034, to $336 billion.  
    • The number of people in the United States with diabetes is projected to nearly double by 2034, to fourty-four million.  
    • Diabetes is costly, accounting for one-tenth of US health care expenditures in 2007.  
    • The Diabetes Prevention Program showed that exercise and dietary changes targeting a 7 percent weight loss in participants with prediabetes reduced type 2 development by 58 percent over three years.  
    • Globally, diabetes affected an estimated 366 million adults in 2011- a figure predicted to rise to 552 million by 2030.  
    • One in three American children born in 2000 are likely to develop diabetes over their lifetimes.  
    • Health care costs adjusted for age and sex are 2.3 times greater among people with diabetes than among those without the disease.  
    • It is estimated that one-third of Medicare dollars are spent on people with diabetes.  
    • The estimated total financial cost of diabetes in the United States in 2007- taking into account medical care, disability, and premature death- was $174 billion.  
    • Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95 percent of United States diabetes cases.  
    • Diabetes affects 25.8 million Americans- 8.3 percent of the population and 26.7 percent of those over age sixty-five.  
    • Seventy-nine million adults (50 percent of people over sixty-five) with prediabetes are at high risk of developing the disease over the next ten years.  
    • Between 1981 and 2006, overall death rates among people over 65 dropped 21%, while the rate of deaths due to diabetes increased by 29%  
    • Diabetes was the #6 cause of death for those over 65 in 2006 with 137 per 100,000 people.  
    • From 2009 to 2034, for the Medicare-eligible population, the diabetes population is expected to rise from 8.2 million in 2009 to 14.6 million in 2034.  
    • Between 2009 and 2034, annual diabetes-related spending is expected to increase from $113 billion to $336 billion (2007 dollars).  
    • Between 2009 and 2034, the number of people with diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes will increase from 23.7 million to 44.1 million.  
    • New and emerging technologies have made it easier for people with diabetes to manage their disease. Improved technology came in the form of a continuous glucose monitor, first approved by…  
    • In 2003-2006, 22.9% of Americans 60 years and over had diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes.  
    • The initiation of insulin therapy in the management of type 2 diabetes involves an approximate 10% increase in total health care expenditures initially, although this is offset by the consistent…  
    • In a community-based pharmaceutical care services program for 194 participants in 2001, days of sick time decreased at each interval (each year for 1-5 years) for one employer, with estimated…  
    • During the first year of a community pharmacy services program in 2003 which included 256 diabetes patients who used scheduled consultations, clinical goal setting, monitoring and collaborative drug therapy management…  
    • In a study investigating the effectiveness of diabetes management services from clinical pharmacists on patients, based on an estimated savings of $820 for each 1% decrease in A1c, the reduction…  
    • Evaluation of a Cooperative Extension Service diabetes education program showed improved nutrition knowledge, anthropometric measures and glucose control. These improvements reduced medical costs by approximately $94,010 for the 62 participants.  
    • In a community pharmacy health management program called the Diabetes Ten City Challenge, in which 573 patients with diabetes participated, the average total healthcare costs per patient per year were…  
    • An evaluation of the Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention found that providing this intervention at age 50 could prevent 37% of new cases of diabetes before age 65. If Medicare…  
    • A statin initiation intervention aimed at Medicare Part D prescription drug plan subscribers with diabetes or coronary artery disease was successful in increasing statin use among this group of members…  
    • In a community-based pharmaceutical care services program for 194 participants in 2001, mean A1c decreased at follow-ups, with more than 50% of patients demonstrating improvements at each interval (each year…  
    • For diabetes patients aged 55 and older, medical nutrition therapy was found to reduce the use of hospital services by 9.5% and physicians services by 23.5%.  
    • A diabetes self-management education program for Medicaid recipients, consisting of a 60 minute initial individual assessment of needs, followed by 12 hours of group education on nutrition and self-management, resulted…  
    • Participants in a diabetes self-management education program for Medicaid recipients, consisting of a 60 minute initial individual assessment of needs, followed by 12 hours of group education on nutrition and…  
    • During the first year of a community pharmacy services program in 2003 which included 256 diabetes patients who used scheduled consultations, clinical goal setting, monitoring, and collaborative drug therapy management…  
    • In a community pharmacy health management program called the Diabetes Ten City Challenge, in which 573 patients with diabetes participated, eye examination rates increased from 57% to 81% and foot…  
    • Projected change in 3-year diabetes-related costs and 10-year disease event rates among Medicaid recipients participating in a diabetes self-management education program consisting of a 60 minute initial individual assessment of…  
    • Average direct medical costs over time, in 2001, for 194 participants in a community-based pharmaceutical care services program for patients with diabetes.  
    • In a trial with 160 participants who had type 2 diabetes, intensive intervention with multiple drug combinations and behavior modification benefited patients with respect to vascular complications and on rates…  
    • Improvements in key clinical measures over an average of 14.8 months in a community pharmacy health management program called the Diabetes Ten City Challenge, in which 573 patients with diabetes…  
    • Patients with diabetes that are hospitalized for a cardiovascular event incur higher costs for cardiovascular care than their non-diabetic counterparts over 3 years. Compared to patients without diabetes, patients with…  
    • Percent Distribution of Age at First Diagnosis with Diabetes, 2004  
    • Due to innovation as well as other factors, the death rate in the U.S. from diabetes decreased by 3.9% in 2007 from 2006.  
    • Medicare beneficiaries with diabetic macular edema (DME) had 31% higher 1-year costs and 29% higher 3-year costs compared to diabetic Medicare beneficiaries without DME.  
    • Three-year (1993-1995) estimates of medical care charges for patients with diabetes ranged from $10,439 for those without comorbid conditions to $44,417 for those with heart disease and hypertension.  
    • In 2007, type 1 diabetes cost approximately $14.9 billion (direct medical costs, $10.5 billion; indirect $4.4 billion), while type 2 diabetes cost $159.5 billion (direct medical costs, $105.7 billion; indirect…  
    • Patients with a long duration of type 2 diabetes were found to have a lower total brain volume and gray and white matter volume than those without the disease.  
    • Of Medicare fee-for-service patients with chronic conditions, more are treated for diabetes than any other condition (24.3%).  
    • In 2004, 31.3 million Medicare beneficiaries living in the community had diabetes.  
    • Type 2 diabetes mellitus affects more than 7% of adults in the US and leads to substantial personal and economic burden.  
    • Type 1 diabetes accounts for an estimated 5.7% (1 million) of the 17.5 million people with diagnosed diabetes.  
    • 150 drugs are in development for diabetes. Diabetes affects 12.2 million Americans age 60 and older.  
    • About 1/4 of Americans age 60 and over had diabetes (either physician diagnosed or undiagnosed) in 2003-2006.  
    • Type 2 diabetes accounts for close to 95% of all diabetes cases in the U.S. and most cases of undiagnosed diabetes.  
    • In addition to Americans that have diabetes, an additional 30% of adults have pre-diabetes, a condition marked by elevated blood sugar that is not yet in the diabetic range.  
    • Close to 1/3 of those age 65 and older have diabetes.  
    • Diabetes drug expenditures rose from $6.7 billion in 2001 to $12.5 billion in 2007.  
    • The average cost per diabetes prescription increased from $56 in 2001 to $76 in 2007.  
    • The average number of diabetes medications used per patient increased from 1.14 in 1994 to 1.63 in 2007.  
    • The estimated number of physician office visits for treated diabetes increased from 25 million in 1994 to 36 million in 2007.  
    • LDL-C Screening: Trends, 1998-2006  
    • After adjusting for age and sex differences, the average medical expenditures among people with diabetes were 2.3 times higher than expenditures for those without diabetes.  
    • The estimated total costs of diabetes (direct and indirect) in 2007 were $174 billion.  
    • Blood pressure control reduces the risk of heart disease or stroke among Americans with diabetes by 33-50%.  
    • Adults diagnosed with diabetes have heart disease death rates about 2 to 4 times higher than those without diabetes.  
    • In 2004, stroke was noted on 16% of diabetes-related death certificates among Americans aged 65 years and older.  
    • In 2004, heart disease was noted on 68% of diabetes-related death certificates among Americans aged 65 and older.  
    • It is likely that diabetes is underreported as a cause of death. Studies show that only 35-40% of decendents with diabetes had it listed anywhere on the death certificate, and…  
    • Estimated number of new cases of diagnosed diabetes in people aged 20 years and older, by age group, United States, 2007  
    • In 2007, approximately 1.6 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in Americans aged 20 years or older.  
    • Estimated prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes in people aged 20 years or older, by age group, United States, 2007  
    • In 2007, 12.2 million (23.1%) Americans age 60 and older had diabetes.  
    • Between 1981 and 2004, age-adjusted death rates for diabetes increased by 38%.  
    • The prevalence of diabetes increased by 8.2% from 2000 to 2001. Since 1990, the prevalence of those diagnosed with diabetes increased 61%.  
    • Percent of category expenditures associated with diabetes  
    • Age distribution of deaths associated with diabetes  
    • The value of lost productivity from premature mortality due to diabetes is $26.9 billion.  
    • Approximately 284,000 deaths in 2007 are attributed to diabetes.  
    • The number of workdays absent because of diabetes in 2007 is approximately 15 million.  
    • Approximately 40.7 million of the 186 million hospital inpatient days in 2007 were incurred by people with diabetes, and 24.3 million more are attributed to diabetes.  
    • The national burden of diabetes is likely to exceed $174 billion because it omits the social cost of intangibles such as pain and suffering, care provided by unpaid caregivers, excess…  
    • Indirect costs of diabetes include increased absenteeism ($2.6 billion) and reduced productivity while at work ($20.0 billion) for the employed population, reduced productivity for those not in the labor force…  
    • Approximately 1 in 5 health care dollars in the U.S. is spent caring for someone with diagnosed diabetes, while 1 in 10 health care dollars is attributed to diabetes.  
    • Americans with diagnosed diabetes incur average expenditures of $11,744 per year. These expenditures are approximately 2.3 times higher than what they would be in the absence of diabetes.  
    • The largest components of medical expenditures attributes to diabetes are hospital inpatient care (50% of total cost), diabetes medication and supplies (12%), prescriptions to treat diabetes complications (11%), and physician…  
    • Medical costs attributed to diabetes include $27 billion in direct care, $58 billion in treating diabetes-related chronic complications, and $31 billion in excess general medical costs.  
    • The total estimated cost of diabetes in 2007 is $174 billion–$116 billion in excess medical expenditures, $58 billion in reduced productivity.  
    • 17.5 million Americans had diabetes in 2007, compared to 12.1 million in 2002.  
    • 1 in 3 Americans will develop diabetes over the course of his/her lifetime.  
    • Following the current path, diabetes cases will increase by 52.9% between 2003 and 2023.  
    • Following the current path, diabetes cases will increase by 52.9% between 2003 and 2023. If an alternative path is taken, there will be 13.3% (2.8 million) fewer diabetes cases.  
    • Decreased productivity due to diabetes costs an individual between $3,700 and $8,700 in yearly earnings.  
    • The risk of developing eye, kidney and nerve disease is reduced by 40% for every 1% reduction in blood glucose levels.  
    • Diabetic retinopathy causes 12,000 to 24,000 new cases of blindness every year.  
    • Diabetes accounts for 45% of new cases of kidney failure in the U.S.  
    • The cost effectiveness ratio for pump therapy compared with daily insulin injections is about $18,000 per life year saved.  
    • Chronic Disease Projected to Become More Prevalent: Prevalence of diabetes is projected to nearly double 2000-2030  
    • People with diabetes are 21.8 times as likely to be admitted for skin ulcers/gangrene, 15 times as likely for peripheral vascular disease, 10 times as likely for congestive heart failure,…  
    • Due to the combined burdens and complications of diabetes, individuals at age 60 that are diagnosed with diabetes have a reduction in life expectancy and quality-of-life years of 7.3 and…  
    • Diabetes is the 6th leading cause of death, contributing to approximately 225,000 deaths per year.  
    • A recent study conducted by the National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) so clearly demonstrated that lifestyle interventions reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes…  
    • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, adult-onset blindness, and nontraumatic lower limb amputations.  
    • Every year, over 210,000 deaths are attributable to diabetes and its complications.  
    • Diabetes is also a significant cause of heart disease and stroke– adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates 2 to 4 times higher and risk of stroke that is…  
    • Diabetes is the 5th deadliest disease in the United States.  
    • Close to 50% of those with diabetes are age 60 and older.  
    • An additional 54 million people are estimated to have pre-diabetes, a condition where blood glucose levels are abnormally high– but not yet high enough to be considered diabetes.  
    • The risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke is 2-4 times greater in people with diabetes, compared to unaffected people.  
    • 1 out of every 10 healthcare dollars spent in the U.S. is spent on diabetes mellitus.  
    • In 2002, 51.8% of direct medical expenditures from diabetes were incurred by people over 65 years old.  
    • Diabetes caused 176,000 cases of permanent disability in 2002–costing $7.5 billion.  
    • The per capita annual cost of health care for a diabetic increased from $10,071 in 1997 to $13,243 in 2002–an increase of more than 30%.  
    • Comprehensive foot care programs for diabetics can reduce amputation rates by as much as 45-85%.  
    • Improved control of cholesterol or blood lipids, can reduce diabetic complications by 20-50%.  
    • For every 10 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure, the risk of diabetic complications is reduced by 12%.  
    • Therapy that keeps blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible in type 1 diabetics, reduces damage to the kidneys by 35-56%. Experts believe that these results can be…  
    • Based on preliminary data, diabetes mellitus was the sixth leading cause of death in the United States in 2004, causing 72,815 deaths.  
    • Widespread use of diabetes prevention drugs that enhance insulin sensitivity could result in a 50% prevention of type 2 diabetes over a 10 to 15 year period.  
    • 1 in every 10 health care dollars is spent on diabetes and its complications.  
    • 48.5% of 64-year-olds with diabetes have 3 or more comorbidities and physical limitations–less than 10% have none.  
    • Approximately 1 in 5 people age 65 and older are affected by diabetes.  
    • U.S. health care use attributable to diabetes by medical condition (in thousands)  
    • Health care use attributable to diabetes in the U.S., by age and type of service, 2002 (in thousands)  
    • From 2001-2004, 23% of Americans age 60 and older had diabetes.  
    • Medicines Reduce Complications of Diabetes: Diabetes patients treated with medicines are less likely to develop other health problems  
    • Disease Management Program Increases Use of Diabetes Medicines and Reduces Total Health Spending  
    • Treatment of diabetes with medication and other therapy saves $685-$950 in health care costs per patient within 1-2 years.  
    • More than 65% of Americans who have diabetes will die of some type of cardiovascular disease.  
    • Therapy that keeps blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible in type 1 diabetics, reduces damage to the eyes by 76%. Experts believe that these results can…  
    • Proportion of Female Population with Confirmed Diabetes in 2002  
    • Proportion of Male Population with Confirmed Diabetes in 2002  
    • Projected impact of changing demographic characteristics on the national cost of diabetes: 2002 – 2020 (in 2002 billions of dollars)  
    • Total cost of diabetes, 2002  
    • Mortality costs attributable to diabetes, 2002  
    • Morbidity costs attributable to diabetes, 2002  
    • Total health care expenditures by diabetes status, 2002 (in millions of dollars and % of U.S. total)  
    • Health care expenditures attributable to diabetes, by medical condition and type of service, 2002 (in millions of dollars)  
    • Health care expenditures attributable to diabetes in the U.S., by age and type of service, 2002 (in millions of dollars)  
    • Share of total U.S. health care use attributable to diabetes by medical condition  
    • Proportion of U.S. health care use attributable to diabetes for various conditions  
    • Projections of the U.S. population diagnosed with diabetes (in millions)  
    • In 2002, the major expenditure groups for diabetes by service setting were inpatient days (43.9%), nursing home care (15.1%) and office visits (10.9%).  
    • Diabetes caused 176,000 cases of permanent disability in 2002.  
    • More than 60% of nontraumatic lower-limb amputations occur in diabetics.  
    • 44,400 diabetics began treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 2002.  
    • The risk of stroke is 2 to 4 times higher in people with diabetes than in those without the disease. The risk of death from stroke is 2.8 times…  
    • 9.7 million American women age 20 and older – 8.8% of all women in this age group – have diabetes. Nearly 1/3 do not know that they have it.  
    • 10.9 million American men age 20 and older – 10.5% of all men in this age group – have diabetes. Nearly 1/3 do not know that they have it.  
    • In 2002, diabetes mellitus caused 54,715 deaths in people age 65 and older – ~74% of all diabetes mellitus deaths that year.  
    • In 2002, diabetes mellitus caused 73,249 deaths.  
    • Between 2002 and 2003, diabetes caused activity limitations for 41.1 of every 1,000 people between the ages of 65 and 74; for 49.4 of every 1,000 people between the ages…  
    • One economic model predicts that if type 1 and type 2 diabetics had begun Captopril (a drug that controls blood pressure and delays the onset of kidney failure) treatment in…  
    • Every additional dollar spent on statin therapy for diabetes patients without cardiovascular disease has produced health gains valued between $7 and $31.  
    • Every additional dollar spent on screening and treating diabetic eye disease in type 2 diabetics on insulin has produced health gains valued at $36.  
    • Every additional dollar spent on intensive blood glucose control for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients has produced health gains valued at $3.77.  
    • Laser treatments save up to $1.6 billion per year through prevention and treatment of blindness in diabetics.  
    • Every additional dollar spent on the overall treatment of type 2 diabetes has produced health gains valued at $1.49.  
    • Blood pressure control in diabetics reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease by 33% to 50%, and the risk of microvascular complications by approximately 33%.  
    • A study by the Diabetes Prevention Program found that the use of the drug metformin by high-risk patients reduced the risk of development of type 2 diabetes by 31%.  
    • The number of people age 75 and older with diabetes is projected to increase from 2 million in 2000 to 8.6 million in 2050.  
    • The cost of complications for type 2 diabetics over a 30-year period are estimated at $47,240 per patient.  
    • The annual cost of diabetes, in 2002 dollars, could rise to an estimated $156 billion by 2010, and $192 billion by 2020.  
    • By 2030, more than 30 million Americans could have diabetes–71% higher than in 2000.  
    • Conservative estimates predict that diabetes prevalence will increase 165% between 2000 and 2050.  
    • The number of Americans with diabetes is growing at a rate of 8% a year.  
    • Diabetic eye diseases consume 25% of eye disease-related health services.  
    • In 2002, the cost of medications to treat diabetes was $7.3 billion.  
    • Diabetes consumes 25% of Medicare’s annual budget.  
    • In 2002, people with diabetes had medical expenditures that were 2.4 times higher than those without the disease.  
    • Approximately 60% to 70% of diabetics have mild to severe forms of nervous system damage causing impaired sensation or pain in the extremities, slowed digestion, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other…  
    • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure; in 2002, it accounted for 44% of new cases.  
    • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease, adult-onset blindness, and lower limb amputations. It is also a significant cause of heart disease and stroke.  
    • Diabetes was the cause of approximately 2.3 million hospital admissions, 14 million hospital days, and 70 million nursing home days in 1997.  
    • Diabetes prevalence in the United States increased by more than 60% between 1990 and 2001.  
    • 17 million Americans–approximately 6% of the population–have type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes.  
    • 20.8 million people–7% of the population–have diabetes.