Chronic Disease  /  Future Economic Burden

While medical innovations and public health gains in the past century have been measurable in leaps and bounds, significant progress against acute disease has revealed an equally enormous challenge—chronic disease on an unprecedented scale. Close to half of Americans have chronic conditions and 1 in 4 have more than one. They cause 7 out of every 10 deaths and cost our country 75 cents of every health care dollar. With chronic disease prevalence growing at a faster rate than the population as a whole, the forecast is daunting.

37 Matching Facts

Search matching Facts:
No results to display
    • The health share of the GDP is projected to increase from 17.6% to 19.8% between 2009 and 2020.  
    • National health spending is projected to grow 5.8% each year from 2010 through 2020.  
    • Absent policy change, the Congressional Budget Office estimates that Medicare spending will grow at an average of 7% each year from 2010 to 2018, rising to $879 billion annually and…  
    • National health spending is projected to reach $4.4 trillion by 2018.  
    • Public payers are anticipated to become the largest health care funding source in 2016, and pay for more than half of national health spending in 2018.  
    • The health share of the GDP is projected to rise from 16.2% in 2007 to 17.6% in 2009. It is then projected to climb to 20.3% by 2018.  
    • Between 2008 and 2018, average annual growth in health spending is projected to be 6.2%. This is 2.1% higher than the annual GDP growth.  
    • Current projections predict a rise in Medicare spending from 2.6% of gross domestic product in 2008 to 9.2% in 2050.  
    • If Left Unchecked Chronic Disease Could Cost the U.S. Almost $6 Trilion in Lost Economic Output by 2050  
    • Growth in hospital spending is expected to increase from 7% (2006) to 7.5% in 2007–partially because of higher Medicaid payment rates.  
    • By 2017, U.S. health care spending is expected to grow to more than $4.3 trillion and comprise 19.5% of the GDP.  
    • U.S. health care spending is expected to grow 6.7% in 2007, and remain near the same rate through 2017.  
    • The health share of the GDP is expected to reach 19.5% by 2017.  
    • It is projected that by 2020 the U.S. will spend $685 billion a year in direct medical costs for persons with chronic diseases, and by 2050–$906 billion.  
    • Current Path, Combined Value of Treatment Expenditures and Productivity Losses, 2003-2023  
    • Projected Annual Costs of Chronic Diseases, 2023 (US$ Trillions)  
    • The total annual economic burden of 7 major chronic diseases. including cost of expenditures, will be $4.2 trillion in 2023.  
    • The indirect impacts of 7 major chronic diseases will total $3.4 trillion in 2023– which is 4 times the cost of treatment.  
    • The most common chronic diseases are costing the U.S. more than $1 trillion per year– which is expected to increase to $6 trillion by the middle of the century.  
    • Medicare spending is projected to almost triple from 3% of the U.S. GDP in 2006 to 8.8% by 2030.  
    • The decade-long projection detailed here expects that nearly $0.20 of every $1.00 spent will be devoted to health by 2016.  
    • Nursing home spending growth is expected to remain fairly steady from 2007 through 2010 averaging around 5.0% per year, before a gradual acceleration over the latter half of the projection…  
    • From 2008 to 2016, combined state and federal Medicaid spending is projected to grow an average of 8.1% per year and to represent 16.4% of national health expenditures by 2016.  
    • Growth in national health spending is projected to be 0.4% higher than the GDP. Health spending is expected to grow an average of 2.1% faster per year than GDP, resulting…  
    • Spending on long-term care services for the elderly is projected to increase at least 2 1/2 times by 2050–to $379 billion.  
    • Growth in public spending on personal health care, which is projected to be 8% in 2005, is expected to continue to outpace growth in private spending.  
    • This year’s outlook for national health spending calls for growth to average 7.2% over the coming decade — 2.1 percentage points faster than projected average annual growth in GDP over…  
    • Health care spending exceeded 15% U.S. GDP in 2004 ($1.9 trillion) and is expected to increase to as much as 20% by 2015.  
    • Public spending represents 3/4 of home health spending and is expected to grow to more than 80% by 2015.  
    • Total hospital spending growth is expected to stay an average of 2% higher than GDP growth between 2006 and 2015.  
    • Providing health care for an older American costs 3 to 5 times more than for an individual under age 65. As the population ages, the nation’s health care spending is…  
    • From 2008 to 2016, Medicare growth is expected to average 7.6% per year, and represent 20.9% of total national health care expenditures towards the end of the projection period.  
    • Total spending on health care is projected to reach $4.1 trillion by 2016.  
    • The health share of the GDP is expected to hold steady in 2006 before it resumes a historical upward trend, reaching 19.6% of GDP by 2016.  
    • By 2015, spending on nursing home and home health care is expected to double from 2004 to $320.5 billion.  
    • By 2015, national health expenditures are projected to surpass $4 trillion.  
    • Health spending is projected to consistently outpace the gross domestic product (GDP) over the next decade, growing from 16% of the GDP in 2004 to 20% in 2015.