Chronic Disease  /  Age - A Major Risk Factor

While medical innovations and public health gains in the past century have been measurable in leaps and bounds, significant progress against acute disease has revealed an equally enormous challenge—chronic disease on an unprecedented scale. Close to half of Americans have chronic conditions and 1 in 4 have more than one. They cause 7 out of every 10 deaths and cost our country 75 cents of every health care dollar. With chronic disease prevalence growing at a faster rate than the population as a whole, the forecast is daunting.

10 Matching Facts

Search matching Facts:
No results to display
    • Percent of older adults with a chronic condition
      In 2011, 80% of older adults in the U.S. had one chronic condition. Half had at least two.  
    • Growth of chronic conditions in older adults
      The percentage of adults age 65 and older with multiple chronic conditions grew from 37.2% in 1999-2000, to 45.3% in 2009-2010.  
    • Most older Americans have at least one chronic condition.  From 2006-2008, the most frequently occurring conditions among older Americans were: Hypertension (38%) Diagnosed arthritis (50%) All types of heart disease (32%) Any cancer (22%) Diabetes…  
    • Most older Americans have at least 1 chronic condition and many have multiple conditions. Among the most frequently occurring conditions older persons in 2005-2007 were: hypertension (41%), diagnosed arthritis (49%),…  
    • About 11% (3.7 million) of older Medicare enrollees received personal care from a paid or unpaid source in 1999.  
    • Older Adults Are More Likely to Have Chronic Conditions, but Americans of All Ages are Affected  
    • At least 80% of older Americans live with at least 1 chronic condition. 50% live with at least 2 chronic conditions.  
    • In 2002, older people made up 13% of the U.S. population yet accounted for 36% of all hospital stays, 49% of all days of hospital care, and 50% of all…  
    • About 80% of the senior population has 1 or more chronic conditions. Because of these conditions, 25% are limited in their ability to perform activities of daily living.  
    • In 2003, 26.3% of noninstitutionalized Americans between the ages of 65 and 74, and 44% of Americans age 75 and over, had activity limitations caused by chronic conditions.