Cancer  /  Prevalence & Incidence

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    • In those exposed to asbestos over a significant period of time, between 2% and 10% will be diagnosed with mesothelioma.
       
    • Men are diagnosed with Mesothelioma 4.6 times more often than women.
       
    • Approximately 2,500 Americans are diagnosed with Mesothelioma each year.
      Life expectancy is rarely more than five years from time of diagnosis and is most frequently between twelve months and eighteen months.  
    • Tobacco smoking as a major risk factor
      Worldwide, tobacco smoking (including second-hand smoke) was 1 of the top 3 leading risk factors for disease and contributed to an estimated 6.2 million deaths in 2010.  
    • There are more than 1.2 million Americans alive today who have been diagnosed with colon or rectum cancer.  
    • In 2015, an estimated 132,700 new cases of colorectal cancer are expected to be diagnosed.  
    • Colorectal cancer represents eight percent of all new cancer cases in the U.S.  
    • Overall, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is about one in 20.  
    • There are more than 2.9 million American men alive today who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer.  
    • In 2015, an estimated 220,800 new cases of prostate cancer are expected to be diagnosed.  
    • Prostate cancer represents 26 percent of all new cancer cases in men in the U.S.  
    • Approximately 15 percent of all men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point during their lifetime.  
    • There are more than 430,000 Americans alive today who have been diagnosed with lung cancer.  
    • In 2015, an estimated 221,200 new cases of lung cancer are expected to be diagnosed.  
    • Lung and bronchus cancer represent 13.5 percent of all new cancer cases in the U.S.  
    • Approximately 6.8 percent of men and women will be diagnosed with lung cancer at some point during their lifetime.  
    • There are more than 3.1 million American women alive today who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.  
    • In 2015, an estimated 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S.  
    • Breast cancer represents 29 percent of all new cancer cases in women in the U.S.  
    • Around one in every eight women in the U.S. (12 percent) will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. A man’s lifetime risk is around one in 1,000.  
    • Around one out of every 25 U.S. citizens is a cancer survivor.  
    • There are nearly 14.5 million people alive in the U.S. who have been diagnosed with cancer.  
    • Around 1,658,370 new cancer cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2015.  
    • Men have nearly a one in two chance of developing cancer in their lifetime. For women, the risk is around one in three.  
    • Most Common Types of Cancer  
    • There are more than 100 different types of cancer.  
    • Around 1 out of every 25 U.S. citizens is a cancer survivor.  
    • Men have nearly a 1 in 2 chance of developing cancer in their lifetime. For women, the risk is around 1 in 3.  
    • In 2014, it is estimated that 4,000 women will die from cervical cancer.  
    • In 2013 alone, an esimated 1.6 million Americans were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer.  
    • Cancer accounts for a quarter of all deaths in the U.S.  
    • In 2013, an estimated 500,000 Americans were predicted to die from cancer.  
    • Between 1990 and 2007 the overall death rates from cancer declined 22% for men and 14% for women.  
    • During the past decade, growth of spending for prostate cancer has averaged 11 percent a year, outpacing rates for other common conditions such as cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases.   
    • More than 200,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the United States each year.  
    • From 2010 to 2030, the percentage of all cancers diagnosed in older adults will increase from 61% to 70%.  
    • A 67% increase in cancer incidence is anticipated for older adults, compared with an 11% increase for younger adults from 2010 to 2030.  
    • Cancer incidence is projected to increase by approximately 45% from 1.6 million in 2010 to 2.3 million in 2030.  
    • Leading Sites of New Cancer Cases and Deaths – 2009 Estimates  
    • Approximately 880,300 of the 11 million cancer survivors living in the US as of January 1, 2005, had been diagnosed with more than one cancer.  
    • About 4,070 deaths from cervical cancer are expected in 2009.  
    • About 11,270 cases of invasive cervical cancer are expected to be diagnosed in 2009.  
    • About 14,330 bladder cancer deaths will occur in 2009.  
    • About 70,980 new cases of bladder cancer are expected to occur in 2009.  
    • About 11,590 deaths (8,650 from melanoma and 2,940 from other nonepithelial skin cancers) will occur in 2009.  
    • Substantially more than 1 million unreported cases of basal cell or squamous cell cancers occur annually.  
    • With an estimated 27,360 deaths in 2009, prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in men.  
    • About 192,280 new cases of prostate cancer will occur in 2009.  
    • About 35,240 pancreatic cancer deaths are expected to occur in 2009.  
    • About 42,470 new cases of pancreatic cancer are expected to occur in 2009.  
    • About 14,600 ovarian cancer deaths are expected in 2009.  
    • About 21,550 new cases of ovarian cancer are expected in the US in 2009.  
    • About 7,600 deaths from oral cavity and pharynx cancer are expected in 2009.  
    • About 35,720 new cases of cancer of the oral cavity are expected in 2009.  
    • About 20,790 deaths from lymphoma will occur in 2009 (Hodgkin lymphoma, 1,290; non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 19,500).  
    • About 74,490 new cases of lymphoma will occur in 2009, including 8,510 cases of Hodgkin lymphoma and 65,980 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).  
    • About 159,390 lung cancer deaths, accounting for about 28% of all cancer deaths, are expected to occur in 2009.  
    • About 219,440 new cases of lung cancer are expected in 2009,  
    • An estimated 49,920 deaths from colorectal cancer are expected to occur in 2009, accounting for almost 9% of all cancer deaths.  
    • About 106,100 cases of colon and 40,870 cases of rectal cancer are expected to occur in 2009.  
    • In 2009, about 40,610 breast cancer deaths (40,170 women, 440 men) are expected in the U.S.  
    • About 192,370 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to occur among women in the US during 2009; about 1,910 new cases are expected in men.  
    • Cancer accounts for nearly 1 of every 4 deaths in the U.S.  
    • About 562,340 Americans are expected to die of cancer in 2009, more than 1,500 people a day.  
    • Around 1,479,350 new cancer cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2009. This does not include noninvasive cancer of any site except urinary bladder, and does not include basal and…  
    • Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Approximately 148,810 new cases and 49,960 deaths were expected in 2008.  
    • Leading Sites of New Cancer Cases and Deaths–2008 Estimates  
    • Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates by Site, Race, and Ethnicity, US, 2000-2004  
    • Age-Adjusted Cancer Death Rates, Females by Site, US, 1930-2004  
    • Age-Adjusted Cancer Death Rates, Males by Site, US, 1930-2004  
    • In 2008, it is estimated that 3,870 Americans will die from cervical cancer.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 11,070 cases of invasive cervical cancer are expected to be diagnosed.  
    • In 2008, 68,810 new cases of bladder cancer are expected to occur.  
    • An estimated 11,200 skin cancer deaths will occur in 2008–8,420 from melanoma and 2,780 from other skin cancers.  
    • In 2008, about 62,480 Americans will be diagnosed with melanoma–the most common serious form of skin cancer.  
    • In 2008, there will be an estimated 28,660 deaths from prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 186,320 new prostate cancer cases will occur in the U.S. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 37,680 new cases of pancreatic cancer are expected in the U.S.  
    • 15,520 ovarian cancer deaths are expected in 2008. Ovarian cancer causes the most deaths of any cancer of the female reproductive system.  
    • 21,650 new cases of ovarian cancer are expected in 2008.  
    • 35,310 new cases of oral cancer are expected in 2008.  
    • It is estimated that 74,340 new cases of lymphoma will occur in 2008–8,220 cases of Hodgkin lymphoma and 66,120 cases of non-Hodgkin.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 161,840 lung cancer deaths are expected to occur, which accounts for about 29% of all cancer deaths.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 215,020 new cases of lung cancer are expected, accounting for about 15% of cancer diagnoses.  
    • In 2008, about 49,960 deaths from colon and rectum cancer are expected to occur in the U.S.–accounting for 9% of all cancer deaths.  
    • An estimated 108,070 Americans will be diagnosed with colon cancer in 2008; 40,740 will be diagnosed with rectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is the 3rd most common cancer among men and…  
    • Breast cancer is the second cause of cancer death among American women. In 2008, an estimated 40,480 deaths from breast cancer in women are expected.  
    • In the U.S., 67,770 new cases of in situ breast cancer are expected to occur among women in 2008.  
    • In the U.S., approximately 182,460 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to occur among women in 2008; around 1,990 cases are expected in men.  
    • Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the U.S., accounting for 1 of every 4 deaths.  
    • 565,650 Americans are expected to die of cancer this year, more than 1,500 people each day.  
    • It is expected that there will be 1,437,180 new cancer cases diagnosed in 2008.  
    • In the U.S., men have a less than 1 in 2 lifetime risk of developing cancer; the risk is a little more than 1 in 3 for women.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 34,360 people (24,180 men and 10,180 women) will be diagnosed with oral cavity and pharnyx cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 37,170 people (18,830 men and 18,340 women) will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 2,370 people (1,330 men and 1,040 women) will be diagnosed with cancer of the bones and joints.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 9,220 people (5,050 men and 4,170 women) will be diagnosed with soft tissue (including heart) cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 306,380 people (228,090 men and 78,290 women) will be diagnosed with cancer of the genital system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 218,890 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 120,400 people (82,960 men and 37,440 women) will be diagnosed with cancer of the urinary system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 2,340 people (1,310 men and 1,030 women) will be diagnosed with eye and orbit cancers.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 20,500 people (11,170 men and 9,330 women) will be diagnosed with brain and other nervous system cancers.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 35,520 people (9,040 men and 26,480 women) will be diagnosed with cancer of the endocrine system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 19,900 (10,960 men and 8,940 women) will be diagnosed with multiple myeloma.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 71,380 people (38,670 men and 32,710 women) will be diagnosed with lymphoma (hodgkin and non-hodgkin lymphoma).  
    • In 2007, an estimated 44,240 people (24,800 men and 19,440 women) will be diagnosed with leukemia.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 22,430 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 65,050 people (37,070 men and 27,980 women) will be diagnosed with skin cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 213,380 people (114,760 men and 98,620 women) will be diagnosed with lung and bronchus cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 112,340 people (55,290 men and 57,050 women) will be diagnosed with colon cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 11,150 women will be diagnosed with uterine cervical cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 180,510 people (2,030 men and 178,480 women) will be diagnosed with breast cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 1,444,920 people (766,860 men and 678,060 women) will be diagnosed with cancer.  
    • A woman’s chance of having invasive breast cancer sometime during her lifetime is about 1 in 8.  
    • Number of People Reporting Selected Cancers, 2003  
    • In 2007, more than 1.4 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed and an estimated 559,650 Americans are expected to die from their cancer– more than 1,00…  
    • Cancer accounts for 1 in every 4 deaths in the U.S.  
    • Breast cancer is 100 times more common in women than in men.  
    • The third most common type of cancer in both men and women is colorectal cancer.  
    • Cancer Incidence Rates for Men, 1975-2002  
    • Cancer Incidence Rates, All Sites Combined, All Races, 1975-2002  
    • Leading Sites of New Cancer Cases and Deaths — 2006 Estimates  
    • There are currently 2 million women in the United States who have been treated for breast cancer.  
    • Women have a little more than a 1 in 3 lifetime risk of developing cancer.  
    • Men have a slightly less than a 1 in 2 lifetime risk of developing cancer.  
    • The National Cancer Institute estimated that in January 2001, there were approximately 9.8 million Americans with a history of cancer.