Cancer  /  Innovative Medical Research

In 2015, more than 1.6 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed and close to 600,000 people will die from the disease. Thankfully, major breakthroughs are changing how we prevent, treat, and cure cancer. Treatments are becoming increasingly personalized and advances in immuno-oncology, a field that uses the body’s own immune system to fight cancer, are causing a paradigm shift in cancer treatment. Use the navigation below and the search feature to view the data and to narrow down your search.

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    • Imatinib, the first chemical agent to target a cancer-specific protein, improved 5-year survival rates for chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) from 17% in the mid-1970s to 63% in 2007.  
    • Decline in Cancer Death Rates in Men
       
    • Improvement in 5-Year Survival Rates for All Cancers Since 1975
       
    • FDA Cancer Approvals for Aug 2014 to July 2015
       
    • FDA approved cancer advances
       
    • Thousands of potential cancer medicines in development
       
    • Gains in healthy years of life and social value from cancer R&D
       
    • New cancer treatments account for large percent of life expectancy gains
       
    • Increase in 5-year survival rate for cancer
       
    • 5-Year Relative Survival Rates for Cancers in U.S.  
    • Cancer Survivors in the United States  
    • The Impact of Personalized Medicine on Cancer Survival in Years  
    • Estimated Number of Cancer Survivors in the United States From 1975 to 2012  
    • Since Congress passed the National Cancer Act in 1971, the percentage of the U.S. population living with, through, or beyond a cancer diagnosis has more than tripled.  
    • There are nearly 14.5 million people in the U.S. living with a history of cancer.  
    • The 5-year survival rate for cancer has gone up 40 percent in the last 40 years.  
    • Since 1991 the cancer death rate has fallen by 20 percent.  
    • Reductions in mortality for lung, female breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers accounted for 60 to 80 percent of the total decrease in all cancer deaths since the early 1990s.  
    • Since 1980, 83 percent of gains in life expectancy for cancer patients have been attributable to new treatments.  
    • From 1975 to 1996, new cancer drugs increased life expectancy of cancer patients by about one year, at an estimated cost of $3,000—well below the estimated value of a statistical…  
    • The increase in the stock of cancer drugs from 1975 to 1995 accounted for about 50 to 60 percent of the increase in age-adjusted survival rates in the first 6…  
    • Between 1990/1991 and 2008, the overall cancer mortality rates decreased by 22.9 percent in men and 15.3 percent in women—around 1,024,400 deaths avoided—primarily due to reductions in tobacco use among…  
    • Investments in cancer research and development between 1998 and 2000 has generated 23 million additional healthy years of life and $1.9 trillion of additional social value.  
    • Since 1975, the five year survival rate for breast cancer patients has increased by 40 percent.  
    • The overall five-year survival rate for women with invasive breast cancer is now 89 percent.  
    • Without screening and adjuvant therapy, the death rate for breast cancer would have increased by about 30 percent between 1975 and 2000.  
    • Use of a monocolonal antibody with adjuvant chemotherapy in HER2+ individuals with operable cancer was associated with a 33 percent reduction in risk of death.  
    • From 2007 to 2011, lung cancer incidence rates decreased by three percent each year in men and 2.2 percent each year in women.  
    • Improvements in surgical techniques and combination therapies increased the 1-year survival rate for lung cancer from 34 percent in 1975-1977 to 45 percent in 2006-2009.  
    • After one year, 73 percent of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with the EGFR genetic mutation who were treated with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor had survived, compared to 15 percent who…  
    • The overall five-year survival rate for men with prostate cancer is 99 percent—up from 43 percent in 1975.  
    • The standard treatment for prostate cancer used to require radical prostatectomy. Now, less invasive therapies like brachytherapy have been shown to have equal outcomes with fewer side effects.  
    • A prostate cancer vaccine, sipleucel-T immunotherapy, in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, reduced the risk of death by 22 percent compared to placebo, and represented a 4.2 month improvement in…  
    • Survival rates for colon cancer went from 41 percent to 63 percent between 1975 and 1995.  
    • Use of an epidermal growth factor inhibitor in the treatment of metastatic colon cancer patients without the KRAS gene mutation saw survival rates of 15.6 months, compared to 5.6 months…  
    • Investments in cancer care generated $598 billion of additional value for cancer patients diagnosed between 1983 and 1999.  
    • Cancer patients in the U.S. experience greater survival gains than those in European countries, and the value of additional gains exceeds the additional cost of care in the U.S.  
    • Investments in research since the 1970s have generated $1.9 trillion of value to society overall.  
    • Between 2008 and 2010, use of colonoscopy for the treatment and prevention of colon cancer saved an average of $150,364 each year, per person affected.  
    • Over the next 10 years, the number of cancer survivors in the U.S. is predicted to grow from 14.5 million to nearly 19 million (9.3 million men and 9.6 million…  
    • Close to one third of all drugs currently in the biopharmaceutical pipeline are for cancer, with around 5,500 potential first-in-class cancer medicines in development.  
    • As of July 2014, 18 anticancer drugs received FDA approval after being designated breakthrough therapies.  
    • Between August 2004 and July 2014, the FDA approved: Six new anticancer therapeutics Five new uses for previously approved anticancer therapeutics Two new uses for imaging agents One new use for a screening test  
    • A one percent reduction in cancer-related deaths in the U.S. would be worth an estimated $500 billion to society from increased quality of life and increased productivity from longer lives.  
    • A 10 percent reduction in cancer-related deaths in the U.S. would be worth an estimated $4.4 trillion to current and future generations.  
    • A one percent reduction in lung, colorectal, breast, leukemia, pancreatic, and brain cancer mortality would reduce productivity costs by $814 million per year.  
    • More than half of cancer deaths in the U.S. are due to preventable causes.  
    • Increased use of medical technology, like colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy for colon cancer screening, could save $178.2 billion between 2010 and 2035.  
    • Pathogens cause around two million cancer cases worldwide each year. Ninety percent of these cases are attributable to Helicobacter pylori (H Pylori), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV),…  
    • If the use of recommended colorectal screening increased to 70.5 percent, 1,000 additional lives could be saved each year.  
    • In 1971, one in 69 people was a cancer survivor (three million survivors). In 2014, that number grew to one in 22 people (14.5 million survivors).  
    • Chemotherapy drugs now target specific genomic abnormalities, about 150 effective drugs are available for cancer therapy, and new surgical techniques minimize negative consequences while producing better results.   
    • Baseline lung cancer screening would lead to more than 130,000 additional survivors in 2012.  
    • Approximately one third of men diagnosed with prostate cancer will opt for surgical treatment.  
    • Drugs like bevacizumab- designed to impede the growth of blood vessels and tumors- can cost more than $100,000 per patient.   
    • The use of imatinib (Gleevec) has increased the eight-year survival rate for early chronic-phase myelogenous leukemia from 65% to 84%.  
    • Medicines in Devlopment for Cancer, 2008  
    • 750 cancer-fighting medicines are currently in development.  
    • Mortality rates for colorectal cancer have declined over the past 2 decades and have had a steeper decline in the most recent time period (1.8% per year from 1985-2002 compared…  
    • Death rates from breast cancer have steadily decreased in women since 1990. This decrease represents progress in both early detection and improved treatment.  
    • The 5-year survival rate for all cancers diagnosed from 1996-2003 is 66%, up from 50% in 1975-1977. This improvement reflects progress in early diagnosis and improvements in treatment.  
    • Colorectal Cancer Screening: Trends, 2003-2006  
    • Percentage of women age 50 and over who had a mammogram in the past 2 years, by age group, selected years 1987-2005  
    • “Among women age 65 and over, the percentage who had a mammogram within the preceding 2 years almost tripled from 23% in 1987 to 64% in 2005.”  
    • Following the current path, the colon cancer incidence rate will increase by 31.8% between 2003 and 2023 (447,000 people). If an alternative path is taken, there will be 17.7% (79,000…  
    • Following the current path, the lung cancer incidence rate will increase by 34% between 2003 and 2023. If an alternative path is taken, there will be 18.4% (92,000) fewer lung…  
    • Following the current path, the prostate cancer incidence rate will increase by 75.4% (786,000) between 2003 and 2023. If an alternative path is taken, there will be 21.5% (393,000) fewer…  
    • Following the current path, breast cancer incidence rate will increase by 50.8% between 2003 and 2023. If an alternative path is taken, cases will increase by 32.2% between 2003 and…  
    • Breast cancer incidence rates in women decreased 3.5% per year from 2001-2004, the first decrease observed in 20 years.  
    • Cancer death rates for all races/ethnicities and both sexes combined decreased by 2.1% per year from 2002-2004, nearly twice the annual decrease of 1.1% per year from 1993-2002.  
    • Cervical cancer screening reduces incidence by over 80%.  
    • A mammogram can detect breast cancer 1-3 years before a woman can feel a lump. Mammography screening for women 50 and older can reduce breast cancer mortality by 30%.  
    • Low dose CT screening for lung cancer costs less than $200 per person, and surgery for stage I lung cancer is less than 1/2 the cost of late-stage treatment.  
    • Image-guided breast biopsy takes about 1/5 the of a surgical biopsy, reduces complications and allows women to commence daily activities in 1/2 the time that it takes after open surgery.…  
    • Because of advances in treatment, the 5-year survival rate for people with actue lymphocytic leukemia has increased from 38% in 1974-1976 to 65% in 1995-2001.  
    • Medicines in Development for Cancer  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, one of the most promising medicines in development is for glioblastoma. The medicine singles out and latches onto the receptors on…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, researchers are currently working on 646 medicines for cancer. All are either in clinical trials or under FDA review. …  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, a radiopharmaceutical currently in development is a synthetic version of a substance derived from scorpions–chlorotoxin. This could be a powerful…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, a number of vaccines are being studied that would cause the body’s own immune system to fight cancer after it has…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, a medicine in development that is a monoclonal antibody, targets the epidermal growth factor receptor. Because cancer cells can become…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, a medicine in development targets late-stage metastatic melanoma. The medicine contains a gene encoding antigen that may be able to…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, a medicine to fight breast cancer is currently in the pipeline. It targets the Bcl-2 protein, which appears to contribute…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, a medicine in development targets CA125, a surface protein, or antigen, that is released in excess quantities by some ovarian cancers.…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, a medicine currently in development may delay the worsening of liver cancer. The medicine is an oral signal transduction inhibitor…  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, a cancer medicine in the pipeline would inhibit production of a protein that may interfere with the effectiveness of chemotherapy.  
    • According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, a cancer medicine in development is designed to induce a powerful immune response to melanoma.  
    • A modest decrease of 1% in cancer mortality has been estimated to be worth $500 billion in social value.  
    • Based on cost-effectiveness consideration, the preferred screening method for colon cancer is a colonoscopy every 10 years after the age of 50.  
    • There are 3 million more cancer survivors today than there were a decade ago.  
    • For women age 40 or older, timely mammograms could reduce breast cancer mortality by about 16%–compared to those who are not screened.  
    • An experimental drug may help those women whose breast cancer worsens despite use of other therapies. The medicine was shown in studies to nearly double the time breast cancer…  
    • An experimental drug has been found to extend the lives of kidney patients by about 3.5 months–from 7 to just under 11. It has also been shown to delay…  
    • Since the war on cancer was declared in 1971, our arsenal has tripled. New drugs accounted for around 50-60% of the increase in six-year cancer survival rates since 1975.…  
    • Studies have shown that annual mammograms reduce breast cancer related mortality in women by 20-40%.  
    • Use of the Pap smear test is credited with cutting the age-adjusted cervical cancer incidence in half between 1975 and 2001, reducing it from 14.8 to 7.9 cases per 100,000…  
    • The 5-year survival rate for localized breast cancer, is 98%–an 18% increase since the 1950s.  
    • If the 1 million surgical breast biopsies performed annually were instead performed using image-guided needle core biopsy, the total savings could be $1.6 billion a year.  
    • Medical research that resulted in a 1/5 reduction in deaths from cancer would be worth $10 trillion to Americans-double the national debt.  
    • Surgical biopsy for lumps in the breast was found by one study to cost 2 1/2 to 3 times more than image-guided core-needle biopsy ($698 versus $243).  
    • A 2002 study found that image-guided percutaneous needle biopsies are between 3 and 7 times more cost-effective than open surgical biopsies, require a shorter procedure time, result in fewer infections,…  
    • Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) precisely maps and targets tumors with better tumor control and fewer side effects than other forms of radiation. In one study, IMRT increased the success…  
    • Cancer mortality declined more than 2% in 2003, a continuation of the decline that began in 1990.  
    • “Knowing that his disease had a high cure rate, Ben Dacus felt a sense of security at a time of great uncertainty. In 1988 he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s disease. Strangely…  
    • Treating cancer patients with oral medicine versus intravenous chemotherapy results in a 2/3 reduction in hospital time and a greater than 50% reduction in costly medication side effects.  
    • Cancer Survival Rate Increasing  
    • Medicines Prevent Cancer Recurrence: New breast cancer drug greatly reduces recurrence and death (5 to 10 years after diagnosis in postmenopausal women)  
    • New Drug Increases Brain Cancer Survival Rate: Temozolomide is the first new drug in over 30 years to treat glioblastoma, a severe form of brain cancer  
    • In the U.S., new cancer drugs have increased life expectancy at birth by 10.7%.  
    • “If you had been diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in 1999, chances were that you would not be alive today. Just 3 out of 10 patients survived for…  
    • Five-year Relative Survival (%) during Three Time Periods by Cancer Site  
    • According to NIH Director Elias Zerhouni, investments of $8.60 per person per year over 30 years has resulted in cancer deaths falling for the first time in “recorded history.”  
    • The 5-year survival rate for prostate cancer has increased from 67% to nearly 100% over the past 20 years.  
    • The 1-year survival rate for lung cancer has increased from 37% in 1975 to 42% in 1999-2001, largely because of improvements to surgical techniques and with combined therapies.  
    • When detected early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer is 90%; however, only 39% of colorectal cancers are diagnosed early, mainly because of low rates of screening.  
    • Incidence rates for colorectal cancer have been decreasing since 1985, from 66 to 52 per 100,000 in 2002.  
    • Death rates from breast cancer declined by an average of 2.3% per year between 1990 and 2002 because of earlier detection through screening, better awareness, and improved treatments.  
    • The 5-year survival rate for all cancers diagnosed between 1995 and 2001 is up from 50% in 1974-1976 to 65%.  
    • Widespread use of telomerase inhibitors could result in a 50% cure rate and a 25% prolongation of life for 50% of eligible patients with solid tumors.  
    • Widespread use of selective estrogen receptor modulators could result in an approximately 30% decrease in breast cancer.  
    • Widespread use of cancer vaccines could result in a cure of melanoma/renal cell carcinomas and a 25% boost in survival for all other cancers.  
    • A modest 1% reduction in cancer mortality would be worth close to $500 billion. A cure for cancer (if one is feasible) would be worth around $50 trillion.  
    • A drug that can reduce the risk of breast cancer in high-risk women costs approximately $1,050 per year. The average cost per year for surgery or other invasive methods of…  
    • Virtual colonoscopy is more efficient at detecting cancerous polyps than standard colonoscopy without imaging, and costs $500-$1,500 less.  
    • Use of tamoxifen, a drug used to treat breast cancer, has resulted in a direct cost savings of $41,372 per year of life gained in women 35- to 49-years-old, $68,349…  
    • Every additional dollar spent on newer, less toxic hormonal therapy for breast cancer patients has produced health gains valued at between $27.03 and $36.81.  
    • Every additional dollar spent on overall breast cancer treatment has produced health gains valued at $4.80.  
    • A drug for testicular cancer that cost an estimated $56 million to develop led to a sharp increase in survival rate and an annual return of $166 million in treatment…