Cancer  /  Human Burden

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    • Tobacco smoking as a major risk factor
      Worldwide, tobacco smoking (including second-hand smoke) was 1 of the top 3 leading risk factors for disease and contributed to an estimated 6.2 million deaths in 2010.  
    • Voters Concerned About Cancer More than Heart Disease, Alzheimer’s, and more
       
    • In one study, 40 percent of cancer caregivers reported spending at least 21 hours a week on caregiving. More than half shouldered the caregiving burden with little or no…  
    • Of those cancer survivors employed at any time since their diagnosis, 48 percent of women and 34 percent of men, made changes in their work because of cancer.  
    • For those cancer survivors employed at any time since their diagnosis, cancer and its treatment interfered with physical tasks required for the job for 25 percent of people, and mental…  
    • Close to one-third of cancer survivors experience limitations in their ability perform activities of daily living.  
    • Depression affects 15 to 25 percent of cancer patients.  
    • Around 59 percent of cancer patients in active treatment, 33 percent of survivors, and 64 percent with advanced/metastatic/terminal disease experience pain.  
    • More than one in four cancer survivors have a high burden from their symptoms at one-year after their diagnosis–even those who are no longer getting treatment.  
    • Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined.  
    • Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men.  
    • Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer of both men and women in the U.S., accounting for around one in four cancer deaths.  
    • Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the U.S.  
    • Estimated Cancer Deaths in 2015 by Cancer Type  
    • Around 1,620 people die from cancer each day.  
    • Cancer accounts for one out of every four deaths in the U.S.  
    • An estimated 589,430 people are expected to die from cancer in 2015.  
    • Cancer was the second most common cause of death in 2014, behind heart disease.  
    • Of those cancer survivors employed at any time since their diagnosis, 48 percent of women and 34 percent of men made changes in their work because of the cancer.  
    • Depression affects 15 to 25 percent of cancer patients.  
    • In the United States, cancer accounts for one out of every four deaths. An estimated 589,430 deaths are expected in 2015.  
    • In 2010, cancer accounted for 1.2 million hospital discharges from inpatient care.  
    • In 2010, cancer patients accounted for 29.2 million office , hospital outpatient, and emergency department visits.  
    • Between 2004 and 2008, an estimated $7.5 billion was lost due to loss of productivity in individuals with cancer.  
    • 17.9% of cancer survivors experienced anxiety as opposed to 13.9% of healthy controls.  
    • Lung cancer is the most lethal cancer in the United States, with more than 150,000 deaths attributed to the disease annually, and a five-year survival rate of 16%.   
    • The top two leading causes of death among those over 65 years of age, regardless of race, sex, or Hispanic origin are heart disease and cancer  
    • Cancer was the #2 cause of death for those over 65 in 2006 claiming 1,025 per 100,000 people.  
    • Five-Year Relative Survival Rates by Stage at Diagnosis, 1996-2003  
    • In 2007, an estimated 7,550 people (5,180 men and 2,370 women) will die of oral cavity and pharnyx cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 33,370 people (16,840 men and 16,530 women) will die of pancreatic cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 1,330 people (740 men and 590 women) will die of cancer of the bones and joints.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 3,560 people (1,840 men and 1,720 women) will die of soft tissue (including heart) cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 55,740 people (27,720 men and 28,020 women) will die of cancer of the genital system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 27,050 men will die of prostate cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 27,340 people (18,100 men and 9,240 women) will die of cancer of the urinary system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 220 people (110 men and 110 women) will die of eye and orbit cancers.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 12,740 people (7,150 men and 5,590 women) will die of brain and other nervous system cancers.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 2,320 people (1,030 men and 1,290 women) will die of cancer of the endocrine system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 19,730 people (10,370 men and 9,360 women) will die of lymphoma (hodgkin and non-hodgkin lymphoma).  
    • In 2007, an estimated 10,790 (5,550 men and 5,240 women) will die of multiple myeloma.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 21,790 people (12,320 men and 9,470 women) will die of leukemia.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 15,280 women will die of ovarian cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 10,850 people (7,140 men and 3,710 women) will die of skin cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 160,390 people (89,510 men and 70,880 women) will die of lung and bronchus cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 52,180 people (26,000 men and 26,180 women) will die of colon cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 3,670 women will die of uterine cervical cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 40,910 people (450 men and 40,460 women) will die of breast cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 559,650 people (289,550 men and 270,100 women) will die of cancer.  
    • In 2006, approximately 40,970 women will die from invasive breast cancer.  
    • In 2003, about 10 million Americans were living with cancer.  
    • Among women, the 4 leading incident cancers from 2000-2004 were breast, lung, colorectal, and uterine.  
    • 85-95% of colorectal cancer patients can be cured if the cancer is detected in stage I. If the cancer isn’t detected until a later stage, then the average 5-year survival…  
    • A woman’s lifetime risk of cervical cancer is about 0.7% with screening, and 2.5% without.  
    • For women who have not been screened, the risk of developing invasive cervical cancer is 3-10 times greater.  
    • More than 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have no identifiable risk factors.  
    • A woman living in the U.S. has a 1 in 7 lifetime risk of developing breast cancer.  
    • About 214,000 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in 2006.  
    • Patients’ treatment times differed during their last year of life, because of increased hospitalization. Treatment times were longest for gastric, lung and ovarian cancers — 35.4, 32.4, and 31.9 days,…  
    • Breast cancer patients spent 66.2 more hours receiving medical care in the first year after diagnosis, compared with similar people without cancer.  
    • Men with prostate cancer spent 55.3 more hours receiving medical care in the first year after diagnosis, compared with similar people without cancer.  
    • Hours lost to patients because of cancer care were 368 in the first year after diagnosis with ovarian cancer, 272 hours with lung cancer, and 193 hours for kidney cancer.  
    • Cancer continues to be the second-leading cause of death in the U.S., exceeded only by cardiovascular disease.  
    • Trends in the Number of Cancer Deaths Among Men and Women, U.S., 1930-2003  
    • Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S.  
    • Cancer Death Rates, for Men, 1930-2002  
    • A woman’s chance of dying from breast cancer sometime during her lifetime is about 1 in 33.  
    • Cancer accounts for 1 out of every 4 deaths in the United States.  
    • Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the United States, exceeded only by heart disease.  
    • Based on preliminary data, cancer (malignant neoplasms) was the second leading cause of death in the United States in 2004, causing 550,270 deaths – ~23% of all deaths.  
    • In 2002, cancer caused 391,001 deaths in people age 65 years and older – ~70% of all cancer deaths that year.  
    • In 2002, cancer caused 557,271 deaths.  
    • Colon and rectum cancer account for about 10% of all cancer deaths.  
    • 43% of older men and 45% of older women with a history of cancer report some type of activity limitation.  
    • Less than 20% of 65-year-olds who have been diagnosed with cancer are free of comorbidities and physical limitations.  
    • 1.3 million cancer patients were discharged from hospital inpatient stays in 2003. More than 650,000 of them were over 65.  
    • 45% of middle-age men who have been diagnosed with cancer in the last year have recurring pain. 41% of middle-age women with a history of cancer experience recurring pain.  
    • In 2002, cancer patients made 25.3 million office visits to their physicians.  
    • In 2002, cancer patients made 2.1 million visits to hospital outpatient departments.