Cancer  /  Future Human Burden

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    • In those exposed to asbestos over a significant period of time, between 2% and 10% will be diagnosed with mesothelioma.
       
    • Tobacco smoking as a major risk factor
      Worldwide, tobacco smoking (including second-hand smoke) was 1 of the top 3 leading risk factors for disease and contributed to an estimated 6.2 million deaths in 2010.  
    • Projected Growth in Cancer Cases by 2035
       
    • If cancer trends continue, cancer will soon be the leading cause of death in the U.S.  
    • Project Number of Cancer Cases for 2000-2050 by Age Group  
    • Over the next 10 years, the number of cancer survivors in the U.S. is projected to grow from 14.5 million to nearly 19 million.  
    • The incidence of cancer in the U.S. is projected to grow from $1.6 million in 2014 to 2.4 million by 2035.  
    • If cancer trends continue, cancer will soon be the leading cause of death in the U.S.  
    • Following the current path, the prostate cancer incidence rate will increase by 75.4% (786,000) between 2003 and 2023.  
    • Following the current path, the lung cancer incidence rate will increase by 34% between 2003 and 2023.  
    • Following the current path, colon cancer incidence rate will increase by 31.8% (447,000 people) between 2003 and 2023.  
    • Following the current path, breast cancer incidence rate will increase by 50.8% between 2003 and 2023.  
    • The number of cancer patients age 85 and older is expected to increase four-fold by 2050.  
    • As our population continues to age, a doubling of cancer diagnoses is predicted– from 1.3 million in 2000 to 2.6 million in 2050.  
    • If current trends continue, by 2050 breast cancer incidence will have increased by approximately 60%, and colon cancer incidence will have increased by more than 100%.  
    • By 2015, more than 300,000 new prostate cancer cases will be diagnosed each year–a 50% increase from 2004.  
    • Between 1992 and 2050, the annual number of colon cancer-related admissions for people age 60 and older is projected to increase from 192,000 to 448,000.