Cancer  /  Economic Value

In 2015, more than 1.6 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed and close to 600,000 people will die from the disease. Thankfully, major breakthroughs are changing how we prevent, treat, and cure cancer. Treatments are becoming increasingly personalized and advances in immuno-oncology, a field that uses the body’s own immune system to fight cancer, are causing a paradigm shift in cancer treatment. Use the navigation below and the search feature to view the data and to narrow down your search.

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    • Gains in healthy years of life and social value from cancer R&D
       
    • Investments in cancer care generated $598 billion of additional value for cancer patients diagnosed between 1983 and 1999.  
    • Cancer patients in the U.S. experience greater survival gains than those in European countries, and the value of additional gains exceeds the additional cost of care in the U.S.  
    • Investments in research since the 1970s have generated $1.9 trillion of value to society overall.  
    • Between 2008 and 2010, use of colonoscopy for the treatment and prevention of colon cancer saved an average of $150,364 each year, per person affected.  
    • Drugs like bevacizumab- designed to impede the growth of blood vessels and tumors- can cost more than $100,000 per patient.   
    • Low dose CT screening for lung cancer costs less than $200 per person, and surgery for stage I lung cancer is less than 1/2 the cost of late-stage treatment.  
    • A modest decrease of 1% in cancer mortality has been estimated to be worth $500 billion in social value.  
    • Based on cost-effectiveness consideration, the preferred screening method for colon cancer is a colonoscopy every 10 years after the age of 50.  
    • Surgical biopsy for lumps in the breast was found by one study to cost 2 1/2 to 3 times more than image-guided core-needle biopsy ($698 versus $243).  
    • A drug that can reduce the risk of breast cancer in high-risk women costs approximately $1,050 per year. The average cost per year for surgery or other invasive methods of…  
    • Use of tamoxifen, a drug used to treat breast cancer, has resulted in a direct cost savings of $41,372 per year of life gained in women 35- to 49-years-old, $68,349…  
    • Every additional dollar spent on newer, less toxic hormonal therapy for breast cancer patients has produced health gains valued at between $27.03 and $36.81.  
    • Every additional dollar spent on overall breast cancer treatment has produced health gains valued at $4.80.  
    • A drug for testicular cancer that cost an estimated $56 million to develop led to a sharp increase in survival rate and an annual return of $166 million in treatment…