Cancer  /  Cost of Disease

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    • In those exposed to asbestos over a significant period of time, between 2% and 10% will be diagnosed with mesothelioma.
       
    • Men are diagnosed with Mesothelioma 4.6 times more often than women.
       
    • Approximately 2,500 Americans are diagnosed with Mesothelioma each year.
      Life expectancy is rarely more than five years from time of diagnosis and is most frequently between twelve months and eighteen months.  
    • Tobacco smoking as a major risk factor
      Worldwide, tobacco smoking (including second-hand smoke) was 1 of the top 3 leading risk factors for disease and contributed to an estimated 6.2 million deaths in 2010.  
    • Projected Growth in Cancer Cases by 2035
       
    • Voters Concerned About Cancer More than Heart Disease, Alzheimer’s, and more
       
    • Portion of Medicare dollars spent on cancer care
       
    • Causes of financial burden on individuals with cancer
       
    • Cost of cancer care in 2009
       
    • Three million cancer patients remain active in the workplace during their treatment, and incur 33 million days of disability each year.  
    • The value of life lost from all cancer deaths in 2000 was $960 billion.  
    • The total cost of cancer in the U.S. is projected to increase from $290 billion in 2010 to $458 billion in 2030.  
    • The value of life lost from cancer deaths is projected to reach $147.6 billion in 2020.  
    • Cost of Cancer Care by Phase of Care, All Sites, All Ages, Male and Female, in 2010 Dollars  
    • The total cost of cancer in the U.S. is projected to increase from $290 billion in 2010 to $458 billion in 2030.  
    • If cancer trends continue, cancer will soon be the leading cause of death in the U.S.  
    • Project Number of Cancer Cases for 2000-2050 by Age Group  
    • Over the next 10 years, the number of cancer survivors in the U.S. is projected to grow from 14.5 million to nearly 19 million.  
    • The incidence of cancer in the U.S. is projected to grow from $1.6 million in 2014 to 2.4 million by 2035.  
    • The value of life lost from all cancer deaths in 2000 was $960 billion.  
    • People diagnosed with cancer are at a higher risk of bankruptcy than those without a cancer history.  
    • In one study, 42 percent of participants reported a significant financial burden. As a result: 68 percent cut back on leisure activities 46 percent reduced spending on food and clothing 46 percent…  
    • Spending on cancer medicines represented approximately one percent of the total national health expenditures in 2011.  
    • Employment disability accounts for about 75 percent of lost productivity among cancer survivors.  
    • Three million cancer patients remain active in the workplace during their treatment, and incur 33 million days of disability each year.  
    • The annual excess economic burden of cancer survivorship, among recently diagnosed cancer survivors, was $16,213 per survivor age 18 to 64, and $16,441 per survivor age 65 and older (from…  
    • Care for cancer survivors in the U.S. in 2010 cost an estimated $137 billion in medical expenditures.  
    • More than 10 percent of cancer patients have annual out-of-pocket costs that are higher than $18,585, and 5 percent have costs that exceed $35,660.  
    • Total annual medical expenditures are $4,187 higher for men with cancer, and $3,293 higher for women with cancer, compared with individuals without a history of the disease.  
    • The direct medical costs for cancer in 2011 were an estimated $88.7 billion: 50 percent was for hospital outpatient or office-based provider visits 35 percent was for inpatient hospital stays 11 percent was…  
    • One in 12 Medicare fee-for-service dollars is spent on cancer care.  
    • In 2011, four cancers accounted for nearly half of all Medicare payments for cancer–lung and bronchus (13 percent), breast (11 percent), colorectal (11 percent), and prostate (10 percent).  
    • Estimated Annual Cost of Cancer Care in 2010 by Site  
    • The total cost of cancer in 2009 was $216.6 billion–$86.6 in direct medical costs and $130 billion for indirect mortality costs.  
    • In one study, 40 percent of cancer caregivers reported spending at least 21 hours a week on caregiving. More than half shouldered the caregiving burden with little or no…  
    • Of those cancer survivors employed at any time since their diagnosis, 48 percent of women and 34 percent of men, made changes in their work because of cancer.  
    • For those cancer survivors employed at any time since their diagnosis, cancer and its treatment interfered with physical tasks required for the job for 25 percent of people, and mental…  
    • Close to one-third of cancer survivors experience limitations in their ability perform activities of daily living.  
    • Depression affects 15 to 25 percent of cancer patients.  
    • Around 59 percent of cancer patients in active treatment, 33 percent of survivors, and 64 percent with advanced/metastatic/terminal disease experience pain.  
    • More than one in four cancer survivors have a high burden from their symptoms at one-year after their diagnosis–even those who are no longer getting treatment.  
    • Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined.  
    • Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men.  
    • Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer of both men and women in the U.S., accounting for around one in four cancer deaths.  
    • Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the U.S.  
    • Estimated Cancer Deaths in 2015 by Cancer Type  
    • Around 1,620 people die from cancer each day.  
    • Cancer accounts for one out of every four deaths in the U.S.  
    • An estimated 589,430 people are expected to die from cancer in 2015.  
    • Cancer was the second most common cause of death in 2014, behind heart disease.  
    • Percent of New Cancer Cases Diagnosed in People Over 65  
    • The most common sites for cancer in Americans age 65+: Lung and bronchus – 140,336 cases Prostate – 117,001 cases Breast – 96,981 cases Colon & rectum – 80,343 cases  
    • Approximately 60 percent of cancer survivors are age 65 or older.  
    • The median age at cancer diagnosis is 66 years old.  
    • Probability of Developing Invasive Cancers within Selected Age Intervals by Sex, U.S., 2005-2007  
    • Around 78 percent of all cancers are diagnosed in people age 55 and older.  
    • Percent of New Cancer Cases by Age Group: All Cancer Sites  
    • There are more than 1.2 million Americans alive today who have been diagnosed with colon or rectum cancer.  
    • In 2015, an estimated 132,700 new cases of colorectal cancer are expected to be diagnosed.  
    • Colorectal cancer represents eight percent of all new cancer cases in the U.S.  
    • Overall, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is about one in 20.  
    • There are more than 2.9 million American men alive today who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer.  
    • In 2015, an estimated 220,800 new cases of prostate cancer are expected to be diagnosed.  
    • Prostate cancer represents 26 percent of all new cancer cases in men in the U.S.  
    • Approximately 15 percent of all men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point during their lifetime.  
    • There are more than 430,000 Americans alive today who have been diagnosed with lung cancer.  
    • In 2015, an estimated 221,200 new cases of lung cancer are expected to be diagnosed.  
    • Lung and bronchus cancer represent 13.5 percent of all new cancer cases in the U.S.  
    • Approximately 6.8 percent of men and women will be diagnosed with lung cancer at some point during their lifetime.  
    • There are more than 3.1 million American women alive today who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.  
    • In 2015, an estimated 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S.  
    • Breast cancer represents 29 percent of all new cancer cases in women in the U.S.  
    • Around one in every eight women in the U.S. (12 percent) will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. A man’s lifetime risk is around one in 1,000.  
    • Around one out of every 25 U.S. citizens is a cancer survivor.  
    • There are nearly 14.5 million people alive in the U.S. who have been diagnosed with cancer.  
    • Around 1,658,370 new cancer cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2015.  
    • Men have nearly a one in two chance of developing cancer in their lifetime. For women, the risk is around one in three.  
    • Most Common Types of Cancer  
    • There are more than 100 different types of cancer.  
    • Of those cancer survivors employed at any time since their diagnosis, 48 percent of women and 34 percent of men made changes in their work because of the cancer.  
    • Depression affects 15 to 25 percent of cancer patients.  
    • If cancer trends continue, cancer will soon be the leading cause of death in the U.S.  
    • In the United States, cancer accounts for one out of every four deaths. An estimated 589,430 deaths are expected in 2015.  
    • Around 78 percent of all cancers are diagnosed in people age 55 and older.  
    • Around 1 out of every 25 U.S. citizens is a cancer survivor.  
    • Men have nearly a 1 in 2 chance of developing cancer in their lifetime. For women, the risk is around 1 in 3.  
    • More than 20% of cervical cancer cases are among women 65 years or older.  
    • In 2014, it is estimated that 4,000 women will die from cervical cancer.  
    • Prostate cancer cost in 2020 is estimated to have a 42 percent increase from 2010.  
    • Breast cancer cost in 2020 is forecased to have a 32 percent increase from 2010.  
    • In 2007, the national average cost of chemotherapy drug treatment was $111,000 annually per patient.  
    • The total cost of cancer in 2014 is $216.6 billion–$86.6 billion for medical expenses and $130 billion for loss of productivity.  
    • In 2010, cancer accounted for 1.2 million hospital discharges from inpatient care.  
    • In 2010, cancer patients accounted for 29.2 million office , hospital outpatient, and emergency department visits.  
    • Between 2004 and 2008, an estimated $7.5 billion was lost due to loss of productivity in individuals with cancer.  
    • 17.9% of cancer survivors experienced anxiety as opposed to 13.9% of healthy controls.  
    • Around 90% of cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed in people 50 years and older.  
    • An estimated 60% of prostate cancer cases are diagnosed in men 65 years and older.  
    • Around 67% of all cases of breast cancer are in women age 55 years and older.  
    • In 2013 alone, an esimated 1.6 million Americans were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer.  
    • Cancer accounts for a quarter of all deaths in the U.S.  
    • In 2013, an estimated 500,000 Americans were predicted to die from cancer.  
    • Costs for cancer therapy, which reached $104 billion in 2006, are now projected to rise to $173 billion in 2020.  
    • Between 1990 and 2007 the overall death rates from cancer declined 22% for men and 14% for women.  
    • Lung cancer is the most lethal cancer in the United States, with more than 150,000 deaths attributed to the disease annually, and a five-year survival rate of 16%.   
    • During the past decade, growth of spending for prostate cancer has averaged 11 percent a year, outpacing rates for other common conditions such as cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases.   
    • Prostate cancer accounts for more than $7 billion in spending annually.  
    • More than 200,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the United States each year.  
    • Cancer is the highest-cost diagnosis in terms of out-of-pocket spending.  
    • U.S. spending on cancer treatment has risen greatly over time, from $13.1 billion in 1980 to $72.1 billion in 2004.   
    • Cost of Cancer Care by Phase of Care, All Sites, All Ages, Male and Female, In 2010 Dollars  
    • The cost of cancer is projected to reach at least $158 billion (in 2010 dollars) in the year 2020–an increase of 27% from 2010.  If newly developed tools for cancer…  
    • The top two leading causes of death among those over 65 years of age, regardless of race, sex, or Hispanic origin are heart disease and cancer  
    • Cancer was the #2 cause of death for those over 65 in 2006 claiming 1,025 per 100,000 people.  
    • From 2010 to 2030, the percentage of all cancers diagnosed in older adults will increase from 61% to 70%.  
    • A 67% increase in cancer incidence is anticipated for older adults, compared with an 11% increase for younger adults from 2010 to 2030.  
    • Cancer incidence is projected to increase by approximately 45% from 1.6 million in 2010 to 2.3 million in 2030.  
    • Leading Sites of New Cancer Cases and Deaths – 2009 Estimates  
    • Approximately 880,300 of the 11 million cancer survivors living in the US as of January 1, 2005, had been diagnosed with more than one cancer.  
    • About 4,070 deaths from cervical cancer are expected in 2009.  
    • About 11,270 cases of invasive cervical cancer are expected to be diagnosed in 2009.  
    • About 14,330 bladder cancer deaths will occur in 2009.  
    • About 70,980 new cases of bladder cancer are expected to occur in 2009.  
    • About 11,590 deaths (8,650 from melanoma and 2,940 from other nonepithelial skin cancers) will occur in 2009.  
    • Substantially more than 1 million unreported cases of basal cell or squamous cell cancers occur annually.  
    • With an estimated 27,360 deaths in 2009, prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in men.  
    • About 192,280 new cases of prostate cancer will occur in 2009.  
    • About 35,240 pancreatic cancer deaths are expected to occur in 2009.  
    • About 42,470 new cases of pancreatic cancer are expected to occur in 2009.  
    • About 14,600 ovarian cancer deaths are expected in 2009.  
    • About 21,550 new cases of ovarian cancer are expected in the US in 2009.  
    • About 7,600 deaths from oral cavity and pharynx cancer are expected in 2009.  
    • About 35,720 new cases of cancer of the oral cavity are expected in 2009.  
    • About 20,790 deaths from lymphoma will occur in 2009 (Hodgkin lymphoma, 1,290; non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 19,500).  
    • About 74,490 new cases of lymphoma will occur in 2009, including 8,510 cases of Hodgkin lymphoma and 65,980 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).  
    • About 159,390 lung cancer deaths, accounting for about 28% of all cancer deaths, are expected to occur in 2009.  
    • About 219,440 new cases of lung cancer are expected in 2009,  
    • An estimated 49,920 deaths from colorectal cancer are expected to occur in 2009, accounting for almost 9% of all cancer deaths.  
    • About 106,100 cases of colon and 40,870 cases of rectal cancer are expected to occur in 2009.  
    • In 2009, about 40,610 breast cancer deaths (40,170 women, 440 men) are expected in the U.S.  
    • The National Institutes of Health estimates overall costs of cancer in 2008 at $228.1 billion–$93.2 billion for direct medical costs (total of all health expenditures); $18.8 billion for indirect morbidity…  
    • About 192,370 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to occur among women in the US during 2009; about 1,910 new cases are expected in men.  
    • Cancer accounts for nearly 1 of every 4 deaths in the U.S.  
    • About 562,340 Americans are expected to die of cancer in 2009, more than 1,500 people a day.  
    • Around 1,479,350 new cancer cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2009. This does not include noninvasive cancer of any site except urinary bladder, and does not include basal and…  
    • Close to 77% of all cancers are diagnosed in Americans age 55 years and older.  
    • Incidence and death rates for colorectal cancer increase with age. 91% of new cases and 94% of deaths occur in individuals 50 and older and the incidence rate for this age…  
    • Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Approximately 148,810 new cases and 49,960 deaths were expected in 2008.  
    • Leading Sites of New Cancer Cases and Deaths–2008 Estimates  
    • Five-Year Relative Survival Rates by Stage at Diagnosis, 1996-2003  
    • Probability of Developing Invasive Cancers Over Selected Age Intervals by Sex, US, 2002-2004  
    • Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates by Site, Race, and Ethnicity, US, 2000-2004  
    • Age-Adjusted Cancer Death Rates, Females by Site, US, 1930-2004  
    • Age-Adjusted Cancer Death Rates, Males by Site, US, 1930-2004  
    • In 2008, it is estimated that 3,870 Americans will die from cervical cancer.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 11,070 cases of invasive cervical cancer are expected to be diagnosed.  
    • In 2008, 68,810 new cases of bladder cancer are expected to occur.  
    • An estimated 11,200 skin cancer deaths will occur in 2008–8,420 from melanoma and 2,780 from other skin cancers.  
    • In 2008, about 62,480 Americans will be diagnosed with melanoma–the most common serious form of skin cancer.  
    • In 2008, there will be an estimated 28,660 deaths from prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 186,320 new prostate cancer cases will occur in the U.S. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 37,680 new cases of pancreatic cancer are expected in the U.S.  
    • 15,520 ovarian cancer deaths are expected in 2008. Ovarian cancer causes the most deaths of any cancer of the female reproductive system.  
    • 21,650 new cases of ovarian cancer are expected in 2008.  
    • 35,310 new cases of oral cancer are expected in 2008.  
    • It is estimated that 74,340 new cases of lymphoma will occur in 2008–8,220 cases of Hodgkin lymphoma and 66,120 cases of non-Hodgkin.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 161,840 lung cancer deaths are expected to occur, which accounts for about 29% of all cancer deaths.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 215,020 new cases of lung cancer are expected, accounting for about 15% of cancer diagnoses.  
    • In 2008, about 49,960 deaths from colon and rectum cancer are expected to occur in the U.S.–accounting for 9% of all cancer deaths.  
    • An estimated 108,070 Americans will be diagnosed with colon cancer in 2008; 40,740 will be diagnosed with rectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is the 3rd most common cancer among men and…  
    • Breast cancer is the second cause of cancer death among American women. In 2008, an estimated 40,480 deaths from breast cancer in women are expected.  
    • In the U.S., 67,770 new cases of in situ breast cancer are expected to occur among women in 2008.  
    • In the U.S., approximately 182,460 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to occur among women in 2008; around 1,990 cases are expected in men.  
    • The NIH estimate overall cancer costs in 2007 at about $219.2 billion–$89 billion for direct medical costs, $18.2 billion for indirect morbidity costs (costs due to lost productivity due to…  
    • Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the U.S., accounting for 1 of every 4 deaths.  
    • 565,650 Americans are expected to die of cancer this year, more than 1,500 people each day.  
    • It is expected that there will be 1,437,180 new cancer cases diagnosed in 2008.  
    • In the U.S., men have a less than 1 in 2 lifetime risk of developing cancer; the risk is a little more than 1 in 3 for women.  
    • Approximately 77% of all cancers are diagnosed in Americans 55 and older.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 7,550 people (5,180 men and 2,370 women) will die of oral cavity and pharnyx cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 33,370 people (16,840 men and 16,530 women) will die of pancreatic cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 1,330 people (740 men and 590 women) will die of cancer of the bones and joints.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 3,560 people (1,840 men and 1,720 women) will die of soft tissue (including heart) cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 55,740 people (27,720 men and 28,020 women) will die of cancer of the genital system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 27,050 men will die of prostate cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 27,340 people (18,100 men and 9,240 women) will die of cancer of the urinary system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 220 people (110 men and 110 women) will die of eye and orbit cancers.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 12,740 people (7,150 men and 5,590 women) will die of brain and other nervous system cancers.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 2,320 people (1,030 men and 1,290 women) will die of cancer of the endocrine system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 19,730 people (10,370 men and 9,360 women) will die of lymphoma (hodgkin and non-hodgkin lymphoma).  
    • In 2007, an estimated 10,790 (5,550 men and 5,240 women) will die of multiple myeloma.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 21,790 people (12,320 men and 9,470 women) will die of leukemia.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 15,280 women will die of ovarian cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 10,850 people (7,140 men and 3,710 women) will die of skin cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 160,390 people (89,510 men and 70,880 women) will die of lung and bronchus cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 52,180 people (26,000 men and 26,180 women) will die of colon cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 3,670 women will die of uterine cervical cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 40,910 people (450 men and 40,460 women) will die of breast cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 559,650 people (289,550 men and 270,100 women) will die of cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 34,360 people (24,180 men and 10,180 women) will be diagnosed with oral cavity and pharnyx cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 37,170 people (18,830 men and 18,340 women) will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 2,370 people (1,330 men and 1,040 women) will be diagnosed with cancer of the bones and joints.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 9,220 people (5,050 men and 4,170 women) will be diagnosed with soft tissue (including heart) cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 306,380 people (228,090 men and 78,290 women) will be diagnosed with cancer of the genital system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 218,890 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 120,400 people (82,960 men and 37,440 women) will be diagnosed with cancer of the urinary system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 2,340 people (1,310 men and 1,030 women) will be diagnosed with eye and orbit cancers.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 20,500 people (11,170 men and 9,330 women) will be diagnosed with brain and other nervous system cancers.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 35,520 people (9,040 men and 26,480 women) will be diagnosed with cancer of the endocrine system.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 19,900 (10,960 men and 8,940 women) will be diagnosed with multiple myeloma.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 71,380 people (38,670 men and 32,710 women) will be diagnosed with lymphoma (hodgkin and non-hodgkin lymphoma).  
    • In 2007, an estimated 44,240 people (24,800 men and 19,440 women) will be diagnosed with leukemia.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 22,430 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 65,050 people (37,070 men and 27,980 women) will be diagnosed with skin cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 213,380 people (114,760 men and 98,620 women) will be diagnosed with lung and bronchus cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 112,340 people (55,290 men and 57,050 women) will be diagnosed with colon cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 11,150 women will be diagnosed with uterine cervical cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 180,510 people (2,030 men and 178,480 women) will be diagnosed with breast cancer.  
    • In 2007, an estimated 1,444,920 people (766,860 men and 678,060 women) will be diagnosed with cancer.  
    • In 2006, approximately 40,970 women will die from invasive breast cancer.  
    • A woman’s chance of having invasive breast cancer sometime during her lifetime is about 1 in 8.  
    • In 2004, the U.S. spent about $72.1 billion in direct costs for cancer care.  
    • In 2003, about 10 million Americans were living with cancer.  
    • For elderly cancer patients, 5 year Medicare costs in 2004 were approximately $21.1 billion.  
    • The average 5 year costs of cancer vary depending on the type of cancer. In 2004, it cost $20,000 every 5 years for patients with breast cancer or melanoma–it cost…  
    • Number of People Reporting Selected Cancers, 2003  
    • Following the current path, the prostate cancer incidence rate will increase by 75.4% (786,000) between 2003 and 2023.  
    • Following the current path, the lung cancer incidence rate will increase by 34% between 2003 and 2023.  
    • Following the current path, colon cancer incidence rate will increase by 31.8% (447,000 people) between 2003 and 2023.  
    • Following the current path, breast cancer incidence rate will increase by 50.8% between 2003 and 2023.  
    • A man between 65 and 74 is 167.2 times more likely to develop prostate cancer than a male under age 50.  
    • Among women, the 4 leading incident cancers from 2000-2004 were breast, lung, colorectal, and uterine.  
    • Colorectal cancer treatment is the second-most costly treatment, and costs over $6.5 billion per year. Breast cancer is the first, and costs about $6.6 billion.  
    • 85-95% of colorectal cancer patients can be cured if the cancer is detected in stage I. If the cancer isn’t detected until a later stage, then the average 5-year survival…  
    • A poylp can be removed during colorectal cancer screening for about $1,500, but if the cancer has metastasized, costs of care can rise over $58,000 over the patients lifetime.  
    • A woman’s lifetime risk of cervical cancer is about 0.7% with screening, and 2.5% without.  
    • For women who have not been screened, the risk of developing invasive cervical cancer is 3-10 times greater.  
    • Breast cancer treatment in the U.S. costs close to $7 billion per year.  
    • More than 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have no identifiable risk factors.  
    • The direct and indirect costs of breast cancer in the U.S. are about $2.35 and $3.13 billion annually. Close to $2 billion of that total is spent on late stage…  
    • A woman living in the U.S. has a 1 in 7 lifetime risk of developing breast cancer.  
    • About 214,000 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in 2006.  
    • Patients’ treatment times differed during their last year of life, because of increased hospitalization. Treatment times were longest for gastric, lung and ovarian cancers — 35.4, 32.4, and 31.9 days,…  
    • Breast cancer patients spent 66.2 more hours receiving medical care in the first year after diagnosis, compared with similar people without cancer.  
    • Men with prostate cancer spent 55.3 more hours receiving medical care in the first year after diagnosis, compared with similar people without cancer.  
    • Hours lost to patients because of cancer care were 368 in the first year after diagnosis with ovarian cancer, 272 hours with lung cancer, and 193 hours for kidney cancer.  
    • Net patient time costs during the initial phase of care ranged from $271 and $842 for melanoma of the skin and prostate cancer, respectively, to $5348 and $5605 for gastric…  
    • The NIH estimated that the overall cost of cancer in 2006 was $206.3 billion. This figure includes $78.5 billion in direct medical costs, $17.9 billion in indirect morbidity costs, and…  
    • The number of cancer patients age 85 and older is expected to increase four-fold by 2050.  
    • As our population continues to age, a doubling of cancer diagnoses is predicted– from 1.3 million in 2000 to 2.6 million in 2050.  
    • More than 65% of all prostate cancer cases occur in men age 65 and older.  
    • The incidence rate for colorectal cancer is more than 50 times higher in people ages 60-79 than in those under 40.  
    • About 77% of all cancer cases are diagnosed in individuals age 55 and older.  
    • Age is a major risk factor for developing cancer.  
    • In 2007, more than 1.4 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed and an estimated 559,650 Americans are expected to die from their cancer– more than 1,00…  
    • Cancer accounts for 1 in every 4 deaths in the U.S.  
    • Cancer continues to be the second-leading cause of death in the U.S., exceeded only by cardiovascular disease.  
    • Breast cancer risk increases as a woman ages. Close to 8 out of 10 cases are diagnosed in women over the age of 50.  
    • Breast cancer is 100 times more common in women than in men.  
    • The median age for cancer diagnosis in the U.S. is 70 years.  
    • Women younger than 65 are about 2 times as likely to survive ovarian cancer than a woman 65 and older.  
    • A woman’s risk of breast cancer increases with age–about 80% of breast cancer cases occur in women over the age 50.  
    • Trends in the Number of Cancer Deaths Among Men and Women, U.S., 1930-2003  
    • More than 95% of colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed in individuals age 50 and older.  
    • Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S.  
    • The third most common type of cancer in both men and women is colorectal cancer.  
    • Cancer Incidence Rates for Men, 1975-2002  
    • Cancer Incidence Rates, All Sites Combined, All Races, 1975-2002  
    • Cancer Death Rates, for Men, 1930-2002  
    • Leading Sites of New Cancer Cases and Deaths — 2006 Estimates  
    • A woman’s chance of dying from breast cancer sometime during her lifetime is about 1 in 33.  
    • There are currently 2 million women in the United States who have been treated for breast cancer.  
    • Cancer accounts for 1 out of every 4 deaths in the United States.  
    • Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the United States, exceeded only by heart disease.  
    • Based on preliminary data, cancer (malignant neoplasms) was the second leading cause of death in the United States in 2004, causing 550,270 deaths – ~23% of all deaths.  
    • In 2002, cancer caused 391,001 deaths in people age 65 years and older – ~70% of all cancer deaths that year.  
    • In 2002, cancer caused 557,271 deaths.  
    • Risk for ovarian cancer increases with age, with the greatest risk in the late 70s.  
    • A woman 70 or older is 13 times more likely to develop invasive cancer than a woman 39 or younger.  
    • A man 70 or older is 27 times more likely to develop invasive cancer than a man 39 or younger.  
    • Colon and rectum cancer account for about 10% of all cancer deaths.  
    • The National Institutes of Health estimated the overall cost of cancer in 2005 was $209.9 billion. This figure includes $74.0 billion in direct medical costs, $17.5 billion in indirect…  
    • Women have a little more than a 1 in 3 lifetime risk of developing cancer.  
    • Men have a slightly less than a 1 in 2 lifetime risk of developing cancer.  
    • Approximately 75% of all cancer cases are diagnosed in people 55 and older.  
    • Cost of Care for Those Who Lose Independence  
    • If current trends continue, by 2050 breast cancer incidence will have increased by approximately 60%, and colon cancer incidence will have increased by more than 100%.  
    • By 2015, more than 300,000 new prostate cancer cases will be diagnosed each year–a 50% increase from 2004.  
    • Between 1992 and 2050, the annual number of colon cancer-related admissions for people age 60 and older is projected to increase from 192,000 to 448,000.  
    • The annual national cost of informal caregiving for cancer patients is an estimated $1 billion.  
    • Direct annual spending for prostate cancer is $3.6 billion.  
    • Colorectal cancer treatment costs about $6.5 billion per year; breast cancer treatment costs nearly $7 billion per year; and cervical cancer treatment costs around $2 billion per year.  
    • 43% of older men and 45% of older women with a history of cancer report some type of activity limitation.  
    • Less than 20% of 65-year-olds who have been diagnosed with cancer are free of comorbidities and physical limitations.  
    • 1.3 million cancer patients were discharged from hospital inpatient stays in 2003. More than 650,000 of them were over 65.  
    • 45% of middle-age men who have been diagnosed with cancer in the last year have recurring pain. 41% of middle-age women with a history of cancer experience recurring pain.  
    • In 2002, cancer patients made 25.3 million office visits to their physicians.  
    • In 2002, cancer patients made 2.1 million visits to hospital outpatient departments.  
    • Age is the greatest risk factor for prostate cancer with more than 65% of all cases diagnosed in men age 65 and older.  
    • The incidence of colorectal cancer is more than 50 times higher in people ages 60-79 than in those under 40. 91% of new cases and 94% of deaths from colorectal…  
    • The National Cancer Institute estimated that in January 2001, there were approximately 9.8 million Americans with a history of cancer.