Aging Nation  /  Life Expectancy

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    • Tobacco smoking as a major risk factor
      Worldwide, tobacco smoking (including second-hand smoke) was 1 of the top 3 leading risk factors for disease and contributed to an estimated 6.2 million deaths in 2010.  
    • Annual strokes: new and recurrent
      Each year, about 795,000 people experience a new (~610,000 cases) or recurrent (~185,000 cases) stroke.  
    • Female life expectancy differences at 65 & 85
      “At age 65, women can expect to live 2.5 years longer. At age 85, women can expect to live 1.1 years longer.”  
    • 1999-2014 death rates for all causes of death among 65+
      “Between 1999 and 2014, age-adjusted death rates for all causes of death among people age 65 and over declined by 20 percent.”  
    • Projections of Life Expectancy by age, sex, race, and ethnicity
       
    • Death rates for men, 1900 and 2007
      Between 1900 and 2007, death rates for men aged 65-74 decreased by 41.6% and by 29.5% for men aged 75-84.  
    • Additional life expectancy at age 85 in 2009 by gender
      In 2009, those who reached the age of 85 could expect to live an additional 7 years for women and an additional 5.9 years for men.  
    • Survival at age 65, 1960 and 2010
      People who survived to age 65 in 2010 could expect to live 5 years longer than those who reached age 65 in 1960.  
    • Life expectancy in 2012
      According to a 2012 study, life expectancy at 65 as well as 85 has increased.  
    • Life expectancy between 1980 and 2013, by gender
      In the United States between 1980 and 2013, the life expectancy for males increased by 6.4 years and by 3.8 years for females.  
    • Difference in life expectancy by race
      Between 2003 and 2013, the difference between the life expectancy of the white population and the black population decreased 2.3 years.  
    • Life expectancy by gender between 2003 and 2013
      The life expectancy for men in 2013 was 1.9 years longer than it was in 2003, and 1.5 years longer for women than it was in 2003. In 2013, women could…  
    • Life expectancy by gender, 2013
      In 2013, the life expectancy for men was 76.4 years and 81.2 years for women. The total population life expectancy was 78.8 years.  
    • Life expectancy at birth, 2010
      In 2010, the life expectancy at birth for men was 76.2 years and 81.0 years for women.  
    • Life expectancy between 2000 and 2010
      The life expectancy at birth for men increased by 2.1 years between 2000 and 2010, and by 1.7 years for women.  
    • Life expectancy 2000, 2009, 2010
      According to the CDC, life expectancy at birth was 76.8 years in 2000, 78.5 in 2009, and 78.7 in 2010.  
    • Life Expectancy Increase from 2000 to 2009
      According to the Centers for Disease Control, life expectancy at birth was 76.8 years in 2000, 78.5 in 2009, and 78.7 in 2010.  
    • Life expectancy at 90 years of age
      Today a person 90 years of age is expected to live on average another 4.6 years (versus 3.2 years in 1929–1931), and those who pass the century mark are projected…  
    • Increase in life expectancy between 1931-2006
      Life expectancy at age 65 in the United States increased from 12.2 years in 1929–1931 to 18.5 years in 2006.  
    • Average life expectancy in 2007
      In 2007, the average life expectancy is 77.9 years (around 30 years longer than in 1900).  
    • Additional life expectancy in 2007
      In 2007, people reaching the age of 65 had an average life expectancy of an additional 18.6 years (19.9 years for women and 17.2 years for males).  
    • Life expectancy at age 65, 1960 and 2006
      The life expectancy of those who lived to age 65 in 2006 is 18.5 more years, while those who lived to the same age in 1960 expected only 4 more…  
    • Change in U.S. life expectancy from 1900 to 2007
      A child born in the U.S. in 2007 could expect to live 77.9 years, about 30 years longer than a child born in 1900.  
    • U.S. life expectancy after age 65 (2009)
      Americans who reach the age of 65 have an average life expectancy of an additional 18.6 years (19.8 for females and 17.1 for males).  
    • Rise in life expectancy by 2050
      Government forecasts may have underestimated life expectancy by inadvertently leaving out the effect of advances in biomedical techology that delay the onset of disease or slow the aging process. Results…  
    • Life expectancy increase, 1990 to 2006
      Between 1990 and 2006, life expectancy at birth increased 3.6 years for males and 1.9 years for females.  
    • U.S. life expectancy rankings in 2004
      The United States ranked 9th for men and women in life expectancy at 65 years of age in 2004.  
    • Deaths, death rates, and life expectancy at birth, by race and sex
      Deaths, age-adjusted death rates, and life expectancy at birth, by race and sex, and infant deaths and mortality rates, by race: United States, final 2005 and preliminary 2006  
    • Life expectancy at birth, by race and sex: United States, 1975-2005 final and 2006 preliminary
      Life expectancy at birth, by race and sex: United States, 1975-2005 final and 2006 preliminary  
    • Life expectancy at ages 65 and 85, by sex, selected years 1900-2004
      Life expectancy at ages 65 and 85, by sex, selected years 1900-2004  
    • Life expectancy at age 85 by gender
      Women age 85 in the U.S. can expect to live an additional 7.2 years; men an additional 6.1 years.  
    • Life expectancy of Americans who reach age 65
      Under current mortality conditions, Americans who are age 65 can expect to live an average of 18.7 more years–almost 7 years longer than people age 65 in 1900.  
    • Life expectancy increases, 1900-1960 and 1960-2003
      Life expectancy at age 65 increased by only 2.5 years between 1900 and 1960, but has increased by 4.2 years from 1960 to 2003.  
    • Change in U.S. life expectancy from 1900 to 2003
      A child born in 2003 could expect to live 77.6 years, about 30 years longer than a child born in 1900.  
    • U.S. life expectancy after age 65
      A person who reaches the age of 65 in the U.S. has an average life expectancy of an additional 18.5 years (19.8 years for females; 16.8 for males).  
    • Life expectancy trends in 20th century
      During the twentieth century, life expectancy at birth increased from 48 to 74 years for men, and from 51 to almost 80 years for women.  
    • The gender gap for longevity
      The gender gap for longevity continued to close in 2004. The difference between male and female life expectancy was 5.2 years – the smallest gap since 1946.  
    • Life expectancy at birth in 2004
      In 2004, the life expectancy at birth reached an all-time high of 77.9 years – 75.2 for men and 80.4 for women.  
    • Americans Are Living Longer
      Americans Are Living Longer