Aging Nation

Every day, 10,000 Americans celebrate their 65th birthday. While the U.S. is experiencing a longevity revolution, at the same time our aging nation is triggering a Silver Tsunami of chronic age-related disease that bring with it increased national health care spending, high rates of morbidity and mortality, and declines in quality of life.

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    • Tobacco smoking as a major risk factor
      Worldwide, tobacco smoking (including second-hand smoke) was 1 of the top 3 leading risk factors for disease and contributed to an estimated 6.2 million deaths in 2010.  
    • Annual strokes: new and recurrent
      Each year, about 795,000 people experience a new (~610,000 cases) or recurrent (~185,000 cases) stroke.  
    • Stroke deaths and disability
      Stroke accounts for 1 of every 20 deaths in the US and is a leading cause of serious long-term disability.  
    • Disability Increases with Age
      “Disability increases with age. In 2014, 42 percent of people age 85 and over reported any disability, compared with 17 percent of people ages 65–74. People age 85 and over…  
    • How People Age 65+ Rate Their Own Health: 2012-2014
      “During the period 2012–2014, 78 percent of people age 65 and over rated their health as good, very good, or excellent. The levels of health reported by older men and…  
    • Female life expectancy differences at 65 & 85
      “At age 65, women can expect to live 2.5 years longer. At age 85, women can expect to live 1.1 years longer.”  
    • 1999-2014 death rates for all causes of death among 65+
      “Between 1999 and 2014, age-adjusted death rates for all causes of death among people age 65 and over declined by 20 percent.”  
    • Number of persons 65+, 1900-2060
       
    • Growth of older adult population between 2000 and 2040
      Between 2000 and 2040, the number of older adults will double to 82.3 million people.  
    • Growth of 65+ population between 2003 and 2060
      Between 2003 and 2013, the 65+ population increased from 35.9 million to 44.7 million. By 2060, this number is expected to reach 98 million.  
    • Racial and ethnic minority older population growth by 2030
      Racial and ethnic minorities comprised 21.2 percent of the older population in 2013, and are expected to comprise 28.5 percent of the older population in 2030.  
    • 85+ population growth between 2013 and 2040
      In 2013, the 85 and over population was 6 million. By 2040, this population will be 14.6 million.  
    • Percent growth in oldest-old population by 2050
      The oldest-old population is projected to increase by 21 percent by 2050.  
    • Older population growth between 2030 and 2050
      Between 2030 and 2050, the 85 and older population is expected to grow 2.3 percent.  
    • Oldest age group growth, 2010-2050
      The oldest age group is expected to grow from 5.8 million in 2010 to 19 million in 2050.  
    • Growth of total population by 2050
      Every age group is expected to be larger in 2050 than it is now.  
    • Effect of immigration on aging population growth
      As younger immigrants move into the United States, the rate of the aging U.S. population is slowed.  
    • Working age population as nation ages
      The working age population in the U.S. is expected to drop from 60 percent of the population in 2010 to 55 percent by 2030.  
    • Older population as percentage of total population, 2030
      By 2030, 19 percent of the U.S. population will be a part of the older population.  
    • Number of older Americans, 2050
      In 2010, the 65 and older population was 40.2 million. By 2050, that number is expected to grow to 88.5 million.  
    • Oldest-old population growth due to Baby Boomers
      By 2030, the oldest-old population will grow immensely as the Baby Boomer population reaches the age of 85+.  
    • Baby Boomer population growth by 2030
      The “Baby Boomers” will cause a significant increase in the older population until 2030, when the last of this group reaches old age.  
    • Older adult population growth, 2000-2030
      The older adult population is expected to grow from 35 million in 2000 to 75 million in 2030, comprising 20 percent of the U.S. population.  
    • Increase in seniors a risk for hunger, 2001-2013
      The proportion of the older population who are at risk for hunger has increased by 45% since 2001.  
    • Threat of hunger for older Americans
      There are 9.6 million older adults in the United States who are at risk for hunger.  
    • Economic insecurity among older population
      There are 23 million older adults in the United States who are economically insecure (at or below 250% of the federal poverty level).    
    • Suicide rates among older population
      Adults 85 and over have a higher suicide rate than any other population.  
    • Mental health treatment for older adults
      Only one third of the older population with mental issues receives necessary treatment.  
    • Future substance abuse among the older population
      There will be approximately 5 million older adults with substance abuse problems in 2020.  
    • Number of older adults who experience depression
      About 7 million older adults experience depression.  
    • Mental disorders among older adults
      Currently, 25 percent of older Americans experience depression, anxiety, dementia, or other mental disorders. By 2030, the number is expected to double.  
    • Falls among older adults
      An older adults suffers a fall that requires an emergency room visit every 15 seconds. Every 29 minutes, an older American dies as a result of a fall.  
    • Chronic diseases among older adults
      Of the total older adult population over 90 percent have a chronic disease (i.e. heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes), and more than 75 percent have two or more.  
    • Disabilities among older adults
      Of people aged 65 and over, 36 percent reported having some sort of disability (i.e. difficulty hearing, vision, cognition, ambulation, self-care, or independent living).  
    • Older adults covered by Medicare
      93 percent of older adults were covered by Medicare in 2013.  
    • Distribution of health care costs for older adults, 2013
      In 2013, the majority of health care costs for older adults went towards insurance, followed by medical services, drugs, and medical supplies.  
    • Older adults’ health expenditures
      More than 12 percent of older adults’ expenditures are spent on health.  
    • Medical expenditures of older Americans, 2013
      The average out-of-pocket cost for health care expenditures for older Americans in 2013 was $5,069.  
    • Hospital stays for older Americans, 2012
      There were 6.8 million older Americans who had at least one overnight stay in a hospital in 2012.  
    • Physical activity in older adults
      More than 40 percent of older adults aged 65-74 engage in regular leisure-time physical activity, while only 27 percent of older adults aged 75+ reported doing so.  
    • Percent of older Americans who are obese
      Almost 30 percent of older Americans were classified as obese in 2014 (according to height and weight self-reports).  
    • Flu vaccines among older adults
      Between January and June of 2014, 71% of older Americans reported that they had received a flu vaccine in the past year.  
    • Common medical conditions in older Americans
      The most common medical condition among older Americans between 2011 and 2013 was diagnosed arthritis, followed by heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and hypertension.  
    • Chronic conditions in today’s older adults
      Most Americans aged 65 and older experience at least chronic condition.  
    • Health ratings of older Americans, 2013
      In 2013, 43 percent of older Americans rated their health as excellent or very good.  
    • Percent increase in population 65+, 2003-2013
       
    • Labor force participation by older women
      In 2014, over 9 percent of women aged 65+ were in the labor force.  
    • Labor force participation by older men
      In 2014, over 20 percent of men 65+ were in the labor force.  
    • Persons 65+ as a percentage of total population by state, 2013
       
    • Older adults as percentage of U.S. labor force
      In 2014, older adults represented 5% of America’s labor force.  
    • Older adults in labor force, 2014
      There were 8.4 million older adults in the labor force in 2014, 4.6 million of whom were men, and 3.8 million of whom were women.  
    • Marital Status of Persons 65+, 2014
       
    • Older adults living outside of metropolitan areas, 2013
      In 2013, about 20 percent of older Americans did not live in metropolitan areas.  
    • Number of older adults in cities, 2013
      In 2013, about 80 percent of older adults resided in metropolitan areas.  
    • Location of older adults, 2013
      In 2013, more than 60 percent of older adults lived in just 13 states: California, Florida, Texas, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, North Carolina, New Jersey, Georgia, Virginia, and…  
    • Growth of 100+ population since 1980
      Since 1980, the percentage of adults aged 100+ has increased at a faster rate than the entire population, growing from 32,194 people to 67,347 people.  
    • Increase in older population between 2012 and 2013
      Between 2012 and 2013, there was a 1.6 million net increase in the 65+ population.  
    • 65 year old adults in 2013
      In 2013, 3.4 million Americans turned 65.  
    • Growth in older population between 1900 and 2013
      In 2013, there were 10 times more Americans aged 65-74 than there were in 1900, 70 percent more older persons aged 75-84 than there were in 1900, and 49 times…  
    • Increase in older population, 1900-2014
      There were 13 times more older Americans in 2014 than there were in 1900 – an increase from 3.1 million to 44.7 million.  
    • Older Americans living below poverty line, 2013
      In 2013, 9.5% of older Americans were below the poverty line, an increase of 0.4% since 2012.  
    • Sources of income for older adults, 2012
      The largest source of income for older persons in 2012 was Social Security, followed by assets, private pensions, government employee pensions, and earnings.    
    • Income of households headed by older adults
      In 2013, households headed by persons 65+ had a median income of $51,486.  
    • Increase in ethnic/minority populations in older adults, 2003 to 2013
      The percentage of older adults of racial and ethnic populations has increased by 3.7 percent between 2003 and 2013.  
    • Growth of older population who are of ethnic/minority populations
      The proportion of older adults who are of ethnic and minority populations is expected to increase from 9.5 million in 2013 to 21.1 million in 2030.  
    • Growth of 85+ population between 2013 and 2040
      From 2013 to 2040, the 85+ population is expected to grow by 8.6 million.  
    • Living arrangements of persons 65+, 2014
       
    • Older adults as primary caregiver, 2013
      There were approximately 536,000 adults aged 65 and over who were the primary caregiver for their grandchildren in 2013.  
    • Older women who live alone
      In 2014, 46 percent of older women lived alone.  
    • Older Americans who live alone
      In 2014, about 12.5 million older Americans (non-institutionalized) lived alone.  
    • Marital status of older population by gender, 2014
      In 2014, 72 percent of older men and 46 percent of older women were married.  
    • Racial and ethnic makeup of older population
      In the United States in 2013, 21.2% of the older population were members of racial or ethnic minority populations.  
    • Older U.S. population by gender
      There are about 5.5 million more older women in the United States than older men.  
    • Centennials in U.S., 2013
      In 2013, there were 67,347 centennials living in the United States.  
    • 100+ population, 2013
      In 2013, 0.15% of the 65+ population was 100 or older.  
    • Percentage of population that is an older American
      14.1 percent of the population of the United States is considered to be an older American.  
    • Increase in number of Americans who will reach 65 in next 20 years
      Between 2003 and 2013, the number of Americans who will reach 65 over the next 20 years increased by 20.7%.  
    • Increase in 60+ population between 2003 and 2013
      The number of Americans aged 60 and over increased from 48.1 million in 2003 to 62.8 million in 2013.  
    • Older adult population increase between 2003 and 2013
      In 2003, the older adult population (those 65 and over) was 8.8 million. In 2013, this number increased 24.7% to 44.7 million.  
    • Emergency room visits due to falls, 2007-2011
      In 2011, 6,893.5 per 100,000 older adults aged 65 and over visited the emergency room due to falls, an increase of 1658.4 per 100,000 since 2007.  
    • Physical activity in older adults with reduced physical or cognitive function
      39.3% of people 65 and over with reduced physical or cognitive function participated in some sort of physical activity in 2012.  
    • Functional limitations in older adults, 2007-2011
      Between 2007 and 2011, the percentage of people aged 65 and over who had moderate to severe functional limitations increased from 29.3% to 32.2%.  
    • Welcome to Medicare benefit usage, 2008-2011
      Between 2008 and 2011, the percentage of people aged 65 and over who used Welcome to Medicare benefits increased from 6.4% to 13.1%.  
    • Older population living in long-term care facilities
      The ratio of the 65 and older population living in long-term care facilities has decreased.  
    • Housing arrangements for adults aged 65-74, 2012
      In 2012, about 97 percent of Americans between the ages of 65 and 74 lived in traditional community settings.  
    • Housing arrangements of 85 and older population, 2012
      In 2012, 8 percent of Americans aged 85 and over lived in community housing with services, and 14 percent lived in long-term care facilities.  
    • Living arrangements of Medicare population, 2009
      In 2009, less than 5 percent of the Medicare population aged 65 and over lived in community housing, and 4 percent lived in long-term care facilities.  
    • Living arrangements of older Americans
      The majority of the older population lives independently.  
    • Medicare payments for older adults, 2008
      Of enrollees aged 65 and over, Medicare paid for 60 percent of their health care costs in 2008.  
    • Prescription drug costs for older Americans
      The average prescription drug cost for older Americans was $2,834 in 2008, an amount that has been relatively stable since 2005.  
    • Delay of care due to cost
      The number of older adults who delayed getting care due to cost has decreased since 1992.  
    • Health care costs for the elderly, 1992-2006
      Between 1992 and 2006, health care costs for the elderly increased by a significant amount.  
    • 85+ population growth between 1900 and 2010
      The 85 and over population increased by 5.4 million between 1900 and 2010.  
    • Older population increase between 1900 and 2010
      The older population increased by 37 million between 1900 and 2010.  
    • 65 and older population as percent of total population, 2010
      The 65 and older population accounted for 13 percent of the U.S. population in 2010.  
    • Projections of Life Expectancy by age, sex, race, and ethnicity
       
    • Death rates for men, 1900 and 2007
      Between 1900 and 2007, death rates for men aged 65-74 decreased by 41.6% and by 29.5% for men aged 75-84.  
    • Additional life expectancy at age 85 in 2009 by gender
      In 2009, those who reached the age of 85 could expect to live an additional 7 years for women and an additional 5.9 years for men.  
    • Survival at age 65, 1960 and 2010
      People who survived to age 65 in 2010 could expect to live 5 years longer than those who reached age 65 in 1960.  
    • Life expectancy in 2012
      According to a 2012 study, life expectancy at 65 as well as 85 has increased.  
    • Life expectancy between 1980 and 2013, by gender
      In the United States between 1980 and 2013, the life expectancy for males increased by 6.4 years and by 3.8 years for females.  
    • Difference in life expectancy by race
      Between 2003 and 2013, the difference between the life expectancy of the white population and the black population decreased 2.3 years.  
    • Life expectancy by gender between 2003 and 2013
      The life expectancy for men in 2013 was 1.9 years longer than it was in 2003, and 1.5 years longer for women than it was in 2003. In 2013, women could…  
    • Life expectancy by gender, 2013
      In 2013, the life expectancy for men was 76.4 years and 81.2 years for women. The total population life expectancy was 78.8 years.  
    • Life expectancy at birth, 2010
      In 2010, the life expectancy at birth for men was 76.2 years and 81.0 years for women.  
    • Life expectancy between 2000 and 2010
      The life expectancy at birth for men increased by 2.1 years between 2000 and 2010, and by 1.7 years for women.  
    • Life expectancy 2000, 2009, 2010
      According to the CDC, life expectancy at birth was 76.8 years in 2000, 78.5 in 2009, and 78.7 in 2010.  
    • Life Expectancy Increase from 2000 to 2009
      According to the Centers for Disease Control, life expectancy at birth was 76.8 years in 2000, 78.5 in 2009, and 78.7 in 2010.  
    • Growth of 65+ population between 2010 and 2030
      In 2010, seniors age 65 and older comprised 13% of the total U.S. population. That number will grow to 20% in 2030.  
    • 85+ population by 2050
      By 2050, the number of Americans age 85 years and older will nearly quadruple to 21 million.  
    • Older American education levels
      Among the 90-and-older population, about one-third (33.7 percent) stopped after high school graduation. Nearly 28 percent continued their education beyond high school, about half of whom completed a bachelor’s degree…  
    • Older population by race, 2006-2008
      In 2006–2008, Whites represented 88.1 percent of the total 90-andover population. Blacks represented 7.6 percent of the 90-and-over population and Asians represented 2.2 percent. About 4 percent of the 90-and-older population reported themselves to be…  
    • 90 and older population in the United States
      Ten states had 50,000 or more people aged 90 and older- California, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Texas.  
    • 90 and over population in 2006-2008
      In 2006–2008, there were an estimated 1.8 million people aged 90 and over in the United States.  
    • Growth of 90+ population between 1980 and 2010
      The 90-and-older population accounted for 2.8 percent of the older population in 1980 and in 2010, they represented 4.7 percent.  
    • 90+ population between 1980 and 2010
      The 720,000 people aged 90 and over in 1980 almost tripled to 1.9 million in 2010.  
    • Life expectancy at 90 years of age
      Today a person 90 years of age is expected to live on average another 4.6 years (versus 3.2 years in 1929–1931), and those who pass the century mark are projected…  
    • Increase in life expectancy between 1931-2006
      Life expectancy at age 65 in the United States increased from 12.2 years in 1929–1931 to 18.5 years in 2006.  
    • Increase in 90-and-older population by the 2030s
      In the 2030s, the 90-and-older population is projected to experience a  71 percent jump, as opposed to a 10 percent increase for those aged 65–89 years old.  
    • Population growth between 2020 and 2030
      Between 2020 and 2030, growth of the population aged 65–89 is projected to outpace that of the population aged 90 and over when the 65–89 age group is projected to…  
    • Age of U.S. population in 40 years
      The U.S. population 40 years from now is projected to have 20 percent aged 65 and over, and one-tenth of them aged 90 and over (that is, 2 percent of…  
    • Increase in 90+ population, 2040 and 2050
      The percentage of 90 and older is expected to rise again—reaching 7.1 percent in 2040 and 9.9 percent in 2050—when all of the baby boomers become 85 years of age…  
    • Projections for 90 and over population, 2010 to 2050
      The total population aged 90 and over is projected to more than quadruple from 2010 to 2050, compared to a doubling of the population aged 65 to 89.  
    • Medicare enrollees receiving personal care
      Around 3.7 million (11%) of older Medicare enrollees received personal care from a paid or unpaid source in 1999.  
    • Older Americans in nursing homes
      Around 1.3 million elderly Americans are currently in nursing homes (around half are age 85 and older).  
    • Daily living activities of Medicare beneficiaries, 2007
      In 2007, more than 25% of community-resident Medicare beneficiaries over age 65 had difficulty in performing one or more activities of daily living.  An additional 4.6% reported difficulties with instrumental…  
    • Health status among older Americans with disability
      Of the 65+ Americans who reported a severe disability in 2009, 64% reported their health as fair or poor.  Among those who reported no disability, only 10% reported their health…  
    • Disabilities in older Americans, 2009
      In 2009, 37% of older Americans reported some type of disability (i.e. difficulty in hearing, vision, cognition, ambulation, self-care, or independent living).  56% of people over 80 reported a severe…  
    • Health insurance coverage for older Americans, 2009
      In 2009, 93.5% of non-institutionalized Americans age 65+ were covered by Medicare.  Of those, around 58% had some type of supplemental private health insurance.  8% had military-based health insurance, and…  
    • Out-of-pocket health care expenditures for older Americans, 2009
      In 2009, older Americans had average out-of-pocket health care expenditures of $4,846–an increase of 61% since 1999.  The average for Americans of all ages was $3,126.  Older Americans also spent…  
    • Office visits with doctors among older population
      In 2007, older Americans averaged 7.1 office visits with doctors–compared to 3.7 for Americans ages 45-65.  
    • Average hospital stay for 65+ population, 2007
      The average length of hospital stay for Americans age 65+ in 2007 was 5.6 days–compared to 4.8 days for Americans of all ages.  
    • Short stay hospital admittance of 65+ population, 2007
      In 2007, around 12.9 million Americans ages 65+ were discharged from short stay hospitals–a rate three times the comparable rate for persons of all ages.  
    • Perception of health status among older Americans in 2009
      In 2009, 41.6% of noninstitutionalized older Americans assessed their health as excellent or very good–compared to 64.5% of all Americans ages 18-64.  
    • Number of Persons 65+, 1900 – 2030
      Number of Persons 65+, 1900 – 2030  
    • 85+ population projections 2009-2020
      The 85+ population will grow from 5.6 million in 2009 to 5.8 million in 2010 to 6.6 million in 2020.  
    • Growth of 65+ population between 2009 and 2030
      People 65+ will grow from 12.9% of the population in 2009 to an estimated 19.3% of the population in 2030.  
    • Older Americans in 2030
      By 2030, there will be an estimated 72.1 million older Americans–almost doubling from 2008.  
    • Increase in 100+ population between 1990 and 2009
      In 2009, there were 64,024 Americans age 100 and older–0.2% of the total 65+ population.  This is a 72% increased from 1990 when there were 37,306 Americans age 100 and…  
    • Number of 65+ Americans in 2009
      In 2009, the number of Americans age 65 and older increased by 770,699.  
    • In 2009, around 2.6 million Americans celebrated their 65th birthday.
      In 2009, around 2.6 million Americans celebrated their 65th birthday.  
    • Death rates between 1990 and 2007
      Between 1990 and 2007, death rates for the 65-84 population declined–by 41.6% for men ages 65-74 and 29.5% for men ages 75-84.  
    • Average life expectancy in 2007
      In 2007, the average life expectancy is 77.9 years (around 30 years longer than in 1900).  
    • Older population in the US, 1900-2008
      The older population in the U.S. is growing older.  In 2008, the 65-74 age group was 9.5 times larger than in 1900.  In contrast, the 75-84 age group was 17…  
    • Older American population growth since 1900
      Since 1900, the percentage of Americans age 65+ has more than tripled (from 4.1% in 1900 to 12.9% in 2009) and the number has increased almost thirteen times (from 3.1…  
    • Growth of 65 and older population through 2020
      The 65 and older population will grow from 35 million in 2000 to 40 million in 2010 (a 15% increase) to 55 million in 2020 (a 36% increase).  
    • Additional life expectancy in 2007
      In 2007, people reaching the age of 65 had an average life expectancy of an additional 18.6 years (19.9 years for women and 17.2 years for males).  
    • Older Americans as percentage of population
      More than 1 in 8 (12.9%) of the US population is an older American.  
    • Americans aged 45-64, 1999-2009
      The number of Americans ages 45-64, who will reach 65 over the next two decades, increased by 26% from 1999 to 2009.  
    • Increase in 65+ population since 1999
      The 65+ population numbered 39.6 million in 2009–an increase of 4.3 million (12.5%) since 1999.  
    • Growth of 85+ population between 2010 and 2050
      In 2010, an estimated 6 million Americans were 85 years and older.  By 2050, that number is exptected to nearly quadruple to 21 million.  
    • Oldest old population projections between 2010 and 2050
      Between 2010 and 2050, the oldest-old are expected to increase from 15% to 24% of all older Americans.  This will result in an additional 15 million oldest-old.  
    • Growth of 65 and older population between 2000 and 2030
      The 65 and older population is project to be twice as large in 2030 as in 2000, growing from 35 million to 72 million; almost 20% of the U.S. population  
    • Population growth of 85 and older population through 2050
      The population of those aged 85 and over is projected to grow from 5.7 million in 2008 to over 19 million by 2050.  
    • Life expectancy at age 65, 1960 and 2006
      The life expectancy of those who lived to age 65 in 2006 is 18.5 more years, while those who lived to the same age in 1960 expected only 4 more…  
    • Number of 65+ Americans in 2008
      In 2008, 39 million Americans were 65 and older—accounting for 13% of the total population.  
    • Growth of U.S. older population between 1900 and 2008
      The U.S. population of those aged 65 and over grew from 3 million in 1900 to over 39 million in 2008.  During the same period, the 85 and older population…  
    • Older population projections, 1900-2008 and 2010-2050
      Population age 65 and over and age 85 and over, selected years 1900-2008 and projected 2010-2050  
    • Total Population, by age: United States, 1980-2050
      Total Population, by age: United States, 1980-2050  
    • Older American population change between 1980 and 2007
      Between 1980 and 2007, the percentage of Americans 65-74 years of age decreased slightly from 7% to 6%, while the percentage of Americans 75 years of age and over increased…  
    • Older population by 2030
      By 2030, the segment of the U.S. population aged 65 and older is expected to double. At that time, the estimated 71 million older Americans will make up approximately 20%…  
    • Percent Increase in Population 65+, 1998 to 2008
      Percent Increase in Population 65+, 1998 to 2008  
    • Persons 65+ as a Percentage of Total Population, 2008
      Persons 65+ as a Percentage of Total Population, 2008  
    • Medicare coverage 65+ population in 2007
      In 2007, almost all (93%) of non-institutionalized Americans 65 and older were covered by Medicare.  
    • Number of Americans 100+ in 2008
      There were 92,127 Americans age 100 or more in 2008 (0.24% of the total 65 and older population). This is a 147% increase from 1990 (37,306 people).  
    • Change in U.S. life expectancy from 1900 to 2007
      A child born in the U.S. in 2007 could expect to live 77.9 years, about 30 years longer than a child born in 1900.  
    • Growth of older population by age group, 1990-2008
      In 2008, the 65-74 age group (20.1 million) was over 9 times larger than in 1900. In contrast, the 75-84 group (13 million) was 17 times larger and the 85…  
    • 85+ population projections through 2020
      The 85 and over population in the U.S. is projected to increase from 4.2 million in 2000 to 5.7 million in 2010 (36% increase) and then to 6.6 million in…  
    • Grandparents as primary caregiver
      About 471,000 grandparents age 65 or more had the primary responsibility for their grandchildren who lived with them.  
    • Number of older Americans living alone
      About 11.2 million (31%) of noninstitutionalized older Americans live alone (8.3 million women, 2.9 million men).  
    • U.S. life expectancy after age 65 (2009)
      Americans who reach the age of 65 have an average life expectancy of an additional 18.6 years (19.8 for females and 17.1 for males).  
    • Increase in American population 45-64
      The number of Americans aged 45-64, who will turn 65 years old over the next two decades, increased by 31% during this decade.  
    • Americans 65 years of age and older in 2008
      Americans 65 years of age and older numbered 38.9 million in 2008, an increase of 4.5 million or 13% since 1998.  
    • Rise in life expectancy by 2050
      Government forecasts may have underestimated life expectancy by inadvertently leaving out the effect of advances in biomedical techology that delay the onset of disease or slow the aging process. Results…  
    • Life expectancy increase, 1990 to 2006
      Between 1990 and 2006, life expectancy at birth increased 3.6 years for males and 1.9 years for females.  
    • U.S. life expectancy rankings in 2004
      The United States ranked 9th for men and women in life expectancy at 65 years of age in 2004.  
    • Projected Percent of U.S. Population Aged 65 and Older: 2010 to 2050
      Projected Percent of U.S. Population Aged 65 and Older: 2010 to 2050  
    • Projected U.S. Population Aged 65 and Older: 2010 to 2050
      Projected U.S. Population Aged 65 and Older: 2010 to 2050  
    • Deaths, death rates, and life expectancy at birth, by race and sex
      Deaths, age-adjusted death rates, and life expectancy at birth, by race and sex, and infant deaths and mortality rates, by race: United States, final 2005 and preliminary 2006  
    • Life expectancy at birth, by race and sex: United States, 1975-2005 final and 2006 preliminary
      Life expectancy at birth, by race and sex: United States, 1975-2005 final and 2006 preliminary  
    • Number of people 65+ projections, 1900-2050
      Number of people age 65 and over, by age group, selected years 1900-2006 and projected 2010-2050  
    • Life expectancy at ages 65 and 85, by sex, selected years 1900-2004
      Life expectancy at ages 65 and 85, by sex, selected years 1900-2004  
    • Life expectancy at age 85 by gender
      Women age 85 in the U.S. can expect to live an additional 7.2 years; men an additional 6.1 years.  
    • Life expectancy of Americans who reach age 65
      Under current mortality conditions, Americans who are age 65 can expect to live an average of 18.7 more years–almost 7 years longer than people age 65 in 1900.  
    • Population projections for 85+ population through 2050
      The U.S. Census Bureau projects that the 85 and over population could grow from 5.3 million in 2006 to about 21 million by 2050.  
    • Older population by 2030
      In 2030, it is expected that the older population will total 71.5 million people (20% of the total population)–twice as many as in 2000.  
    • U.S. population over age 65 and over age 85 in 2006
      37 million (12% of the population) Americans were age 65 and older in 2006. This population grew from 3 million to 37 million over the 20th century. There were just…  
    • The aging baby boomers
      The baby boomer group now includes about 78 million Americans–27 million are ages 55-62 and 51 million ages 44-54.  
    • Change in 100+ population between 1990 and 2006
      In 2006, there was a 97% increase in the number of Americans aged 100 and older compared to 1990 (73,674 in 2006 compared to 37,306 in 1990).  
    • Increase in 65+ population in 2006
      Census estimates in 2006 showed an annual net increase of almost 500,000 in the number of persons 65 and over.  
    • Growth of 65+ population since 1900
      Since 1900, the number of Americans ages 65 and older has increased twelve times–from 3.1 million to 37.3 million.  
    • Increase in Americans aged 45-64 since 1996
      The population of Americans who will reach 65 over the next two decades, those aged 45-64, has increased 39% since 1996.  
    • 65+ population in 2006
      The population of Americans 65 years and older was 37.3 million in 2006– 1 in 8 Americans.  
    • Health Insurance Coverage of Persons 65+: 2006
      Health Insurance Coverage of Persons 65+: 2006  
    • Number of Persons 65+, 1900-2030
      Number of Persons 65+, 1900-2030 (in millions)  
    • Population Projections: 65 and over
      Population Projections: 65 and over  
    • Increase in 65 and older population, 2003 to 2030
      The U.S. census bureau projects a rise in the 65 and older population, from 12.4% in 2003 to 17.4% in 2030.  
    • Number of Persons 65+, 1900-2003
      Number of Persons 65+, 1900-2003 (numbers in millions)  
    • Increase in 100+ population between 1990 and 2004
      There were 64,658 persons age 100 and older in 2004 (0.18% of the population). This is a 73% increase from the 1990 figure of 37,306.  
    • Life expectancy increases, 1900-1960 and 1960-2003
      Life expectancy at age 65 increased by only 2.5 years between 1900 and 1960, but has increased by 4.2 years from 1960 to 2003.  
    • Change in U.S. life expectancy from 1900 to 2003
      A child born in 2003 could expect to live 77.6 years, about 30 years longer than a child born in 1900.  
    • Projections for 85+ population, 2010 and 2020
      The number of people age 85 and older is projected to be 6.1 million in 2010, and increase to 7.3 million in 2020.  
    • U.S. life expectancy after age 65
      A person who reaches the age of 65 in the U.S. has an average life expectancy of an additional 18.5 years (19.8 years for females; 16.8 for males).  
    • Older American population
      About 1 in 8 (12.4%) of the population is an older American.  
    • Increase in 65+ Americans between 1994 and 2004
      There were 36.3 million Americans age 65 and older in 2004, an increase of 3.1 million (9.3%) since 1994.  
    • Risk-adjusted mortality ratios in hospitals
      Based on 2000-2002 mortality rates for Medicare beneficiaries, there is a 33-percentage point spread between the risk-adjusted mortality ratios achieved in the best 10% of hospitals and the bottom 10%.…  
    • Half of U.S. adults receive recommended preventative care
      Based on patients’ reports, about 50% of U.S. adults receive all recommended clinical screening tests and preventative care, according to U.S. national guidelines.  
    • Medicare beneficiaries over age 65 and 85 in 2003
      51% of non-institutionalized Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older in 2003 were between 65 and 74 years old; 12% were age 85 and older.  
    • Baby boomers in the U.S. (2005)
      As of July 1, 2005, there were about 78.2 million baby boomers in the U.S. Starting in 2006, 330 of them will turn 60 every hour.  
    • Population projections between 2004 and 2024
      Between 2004 and 2014, the 65 and older population is projected to increase by 25.2%. Between 2004 and 2024, it is projected to increase by 70.2%.  
    • Older population by 2050
      By 2050, individuals ages 65-74 are projected to make up 9% of the population. Individuals ages 75 and older are projected to make up 11.6% of the population.  
    • Population projections 2020
      By 2020, the 65 and older population is projected to be over 54 million. The 75 and older population is projected to be close to 23 million.  
    • Life expectancy trends in 20th century
      During the twentieth century, life expectancy at birth increased from 48 to 74 years for men, and from 51 to almost 80 years for women.  
    • 65 and older population since 1900
      Since 1900, the 65 and older population has doubled 3 times.  
    • U.S. 65+ population in 2030
      Because of longer life spans and aging baby boomers, the U.S. population aged 65 and older will double to 71 million (20% of the population) by 2030.  
    • Projected Population Growth
      Projected Population Growth  
    • Percentage of the Population Age 65 and Over, by County and State, 2004
      Percentage of the Population Age 65 and Over, by County and State, 2004  
    • Population Growth
      Population Growth  
    • Changing Demographics of the U.S. Population, 2000-2100
      Changing Demographics of the U.S. Population, 2000-2100  
    • Total population and older population: United States, 1950-2050
      Total population and older population: United States, 1950-2050  
    • Percent of population in five age groups: United States, 1950, 2004, and 2050
      Percent of population in five age groups: United States, 1950, 2004, and 2050  
    • The gender gap for longevity
      The gender gap for longevity continued to close in 2004. The difference between male and female life expectancy was 5.2 years – the smallest gap since 1946.  
    • Life expectancy at birth in 2004
      In 2004, the life expectancy at birth reached an all-time high of 77.9 years – 75.2 for men and 80.4 for women.  
    • Population projection 55-64 between 2004 and 2024
      Between 2004 and 2014, the population 55-64 years of age is projected to increased by 35.9%. Between 2004 and 2024 it is projected to increase by 42.9%.  
    • Older population in 2004
      In 2004, those age 65-74 made up 6.3% of the population and those age 75 and older made up 6.1% of the population.  
    • Population projections 2010
      By 2010, the 65 and older population is projected to be over 40 million. The 75 and older population is projected to be close to 19 million.  
    • Older population by 2040
      By 2040, the 65 and older population is projected to be over 80 million. The 75 and older population is projected to be over 44 million.  
    • Older population projections by 2030
      By 2030, the 65 and older population is projected to be over 71 million. The 75 and older population is projected to be over 33 million.  
    • Older population projections by 2050
      By 2050, the 65 and older population is projected to be close to 87 million. The 75 and older population is projected to be close to 49 million.  
    • Population projection 65-74 by 2040
      Between 2004 and 2050, the 65-74 population will increase from 6% to 9% of the total and the 75 and older population will increase from 6% to 12%. By the…  
    • Baby boomers in 2029
      By 2029, all of the baby boomers will be age 65 and older.  
    • Growth of 55-64 population in ten years
      The 55-64 population is projected to be the fastest growing segment of the adult population over the next 10 years.  
    • Aging of the U.S. population from 1950 to 2004
      Between 1950 and 2004, the U.S. population got older. During that time, the under 18 population fell from 31% to 25% of the total population; while the 55-64 population grew…  
    • Older population growth between 1950 and 2004
      From 1950 to 2004, the total U.S. resident population grew from 150 million to 294 million–an annual growth rate of 1%. During that same time, the 65 and older population…  
    • Americans Are Living Longer
      Americans Are Living Longer  
    • Number of centenarians by 2045
      By 2045, the number of centenarians in the United States is projected to reach 757,000.  
    • Number of 65 year olds, starting in 2011-2031
      On January 1, 2011, as the baby boomers begin to celebrate their 65th birthdays, 10,000 people will turn 65 every day–this will continue for 20 years.  
    • Growth of oldest-old Americans during the 20th century
      During the twentieth century, the population of oldest-old Americans (those age 85 and older) grew from just over 100,000 to 4.2 million.  
    • Centenarians in U.S. in 2004
      In 2004, there were an estimated 60,800 centenarians (those age 100 and older) in the United States.  
    • Every day, more than 6,000 Americans celebrate their 65th birthday.
      Every day, more than 6,000 Americans celebrate their 65th birthday.